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Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 ‘Self-Division : Little Song Selections
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Judge's Report: Lachlan Brown’s ‘Self-division: little song selections’, this year’s runner-up, is a series of playful but moody sonnets set in suburban Western Sydney, structured around the prime-numbered tracks of what could be a hoax record by an unknown band. Brown’s breathtaking enjambments (‘those ads you accident- / ally click on before the world / explodes’) give the malle(y)able sonnet form yet another lease of life.

Includes

Atchinson Road Cutback i "It’s weird to start at track two:", Lachlan Brown , 2017 single work poetry
— Appears in: Overland , Autumn no. 226 2017; (p. 32)
Flickpass Reformation i "You own that thick guilt,", Lachlan Brown , 2017 single work poetry
— Appears in: Overland , Autumn no. 226 2017; (p. 33)
General Revelation i "Ambulance Doppler approach, so", Lachlan Brown , 2017 single work poetry
— Appears in: Overland , Autumn no. 226 2017; (p. 33)
Mindfulness Zombie Trust Exercise i "Omphagic colouring-in, like he’s", Lachlan Brown , 2017 single work poetry
— Appears in: Overland , Autumn no. 226 2017; (p. 34)
Out of Timers i "He’s jamming the scanner so", Lachlan Brown , 2017 single work poetry
— Appears in: Overland , Autumn no. 226 2017; (p. 34)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Overland no. 226 Autumn 2017 11133932 2017 periodical issue

    'When does a life bend toward freedom? grasp its direction?

    How do you know you're not circling in pale dreams, nostalgia, stagnation’

    'So asked Adrienne Rich, documenter of exiles, revolutionaries and the twentieth century. Too often, our response to uncertainty and impending apocalypse is that we must save this world - a world of yearning for counterfeit yesterdays and rehabilitated tomorrows. Or worse, for things to continue as they are, as we have come to believe they have always been; a world we are told is ‘already great’, ad nauseam.' (Jacinda Woodhead, Editorial Introduction)

    2017
    pg. 32-34
Last amended 5 May 2017 11:12:14
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