AustLit logo
image of person or book cover 1767047666922153994.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y separately published work icon The Lucky Galah single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 The Lucky Galah
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'It’s 1969 and a remote Australian coastal town is poised to play its part in the Moon Landing. An influx of expat NASA employees working at the tracking station on the sand dune just out of town shakes things up. A pink and grey galah cockatoo emerges from a cage at the back door of the Kelly household and uncovers some tightly-held secrets. She threads these playfully through the story of her own rising and falling fortunes in what we call the lucky country.' (Publications summary)

Notes

  • Dedication: To the memory of my father Brian Sorensen

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Picador , 2018 .
      image of person or book cover 1767047666922153994.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 304p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 27 February 2018

      ISBN: 9781760552657

Other Formats

  • Sound recording.
  • Also large print.
  • Dyslexic edition.

Works about this Work

Josephine Taylor Reviews 'The Lucky Galah' Josephine Taylor , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 401 2018; (p. 39)

— Review of The Lucky Galah Tracy Sorensen , 2018 single work novel

'In 1969, in a quintessentially Australian town on the remote north-west coast, the locals prepare to celebrate their role in the moon landing. In 2000, as the townsfolk brace themselves for a cyclone, Lucky, this novel’s pink and grey narrator, uses transmissions from a satellite dish tuned to galah frequency to make sense of what she saw and heard from her cage in the 1960s. Quirky? Unbelievable? Tracy Sorensen’s The Lucky Galah upsets preconceptions in a smart and charming account of a human population on the cusp of radical social transformation. (Introduction)

Tracy Sorensen : The Lucky Galah Michelle McLaren , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: The Newtown Review of Books , March 2018;

'There’s much more to Tracy Sorensen’s impressive debut than just an original premise.'

Flight of Fantasy Lorien Kaye (interviewer), 2017 single work interview
— Appears in: Books + Publishing , May vol. 97 no. 2 2017; (p. 28)

'Tracy Sorensen's 'The Lucky Galah' (Picador, March) recounts the lives of ordinary Australians from the 1960s until the 2000s, as narrated by a galah called Lucky. The conceit is handled 'with a deft touch so that the characters come to life as vividly as the ideas', writes reviewer Lorien Kaye. She spoke to the author.' (Introduction)

Josephine Taylor Reviews 'The Lucky Galah' Josephine Taylor , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 401 2018; (p. 39)

— Review of The Lucky Galah Tracy Sorensen , 2018 single work novel

'In 1969, in a quintessentially Australian town on the remote north-west coast, the locals prepare to celebrate their role in the moon landing. In 2000, as the townsfolk brace themselves for a cyclone, Lucky, this novel’s pink and grey narrator, uses transmissions from a satellite dish tuned to galah frequency to make sense of what she saw and heard from her cage in the 1960s. Quirky? Unbelievable? Tracy Sorensen’s The Lucky Galah upsets preconceptions in a smart and charming account of a human population on the cusp of radical social transformation. (Introduction)

Flight of Fantasy Lorien Kaye (interviewer), 2017 single work interview
— Appears in: Books + Publishing , May vol. 97 no. 2 2017; (p. 28)

'Tracy Sorensen's 'The Lucky Galah' (Picador, March) recounts the lives of ordinary Australians from the 1960s until the 2000s, as narrated by a galah called Lucky. The conceit is handled 'with a deft touch so that the characters come to life as vividly as the ideas', writes reviewer Lorien Kaye. She spoke to the author.' (Introduction)

Tracy Sorensen : The Lucky Galah Michelle McLaren , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: The Newtown Review of Books , March 2018;

'There’s much more to Tracy Sorensen’s impressive debut than just an original premise.'

Last amended 30 Nov 2020 14:14:35
Settings:
  • 1969
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X