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Patricia Clarke Patricia Clarke i(A11460 works by) (a.k.a. Mary Patricia Clarke)
Born: Established: 1926 ;
Gender: Female
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Works By

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1 Bravery and Disaffection on the Western Front : The Letters of Major Lyndhurst Falkiner Giblin DSO, MC Patricia Clarke , 2016 single work biography
— Appears in: The National Library of Australia Magazine , March vol. 8 no. 1 2016; (p. 27-30)
'Major Lyndhurst Falkiner Giblin was a brave First World War officer who led his men of the Tasmanian 40th Battalion in desperate battles on the Western Front. He was wounded three times and awarded the Military Cross and the Distinguished Service Order, decorations that suggest he was in the mould of a conventional, courageous AIF officer. His wartime letters held in the Library’s Manuscripts Collection, however, reveal a more complex, nuanced attitude to the war than an account of his bravery and leadership might suggest.' (Introduction)
1 The Island Patricia Clarke , 2016 extract criticism (Rosa! Rosa! : A Life of Rosa Praed, Novelist and Spiritualist)
— Appears in: Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism , no. 319 2016; (p. 253-260)
1 On the Frontier Patricia Clarke , 2016 extract criticism (Rosa! Rosa! : A Life of Rosa Praed, Novelist and Spiritualist)
— Appears in: Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism , no. 319 2016; (p. 248-253)
[In the following essays, Clarke first offers an account of Praed's early life in the Australian bush and her experiences as a young adult accompanying her father to social events in Brisbane. Clarke observes that the author's time spent listening to "the machinations of Queensland politicians and society figures in their public and prime lives gave her a wider knowledge of human nature" than her English contemporaries assumed she possessed. Clarke then discusses Praed's marriage and her subsequent move to Curtis Island. noting that the "oppressive isolation of her situation" can be felt throughout her novels set on the island.] (Publication abstract)
1 Australian Journalist Reports from the ‘Storm Centre of Asia’ : Manzou (Manchuria), 1931-32 : Janet Mitchell Journalist, Internationalist, Educationalist Patricia Clarke , 2016 single work biography
— Appears in: Victorian Historical Journal , December vol. 87 no. 2 2016; (p. 217-236)
'In the early 1930s Janet Mitchell was in a unique position to report the Japanese occupation of Manzhou (Manchuria), an event now regarded as the forerunner of World War II. She watched as Japanese troops marched into the strategic city of Harbin and observed the League of Nations remain impotent as Japan occupied the Chinese province. Her opportunities in journalism, hard-won and precarious, flowed from her participation in international organisations but she turned to senior roles in education for intermittent financial security. Her life story illustrates the difficulties highly qualified and dedicated women faced in pursuing careers in the period between the wars. ' (Publication abstract)
1 Newton, Maxwell (1929–90) Patricia Clarke , 2014 single work companion entry
— Appears in: A Companion to the Australian Media : N 2014; (p. 315)
1 Press, Australian Capital Territory Patricia Clarke , 2014 single work companion entry
— Appears in: A Companion to the Australian Media : P 2014; (p. 348-349)
1 Women in the Media Patricia Clarke , 2014 single work companion entry
— Appears in: A Companion to the Australian Media : W 2014; (p. 495-498)
1 Boling, (Elizabeth) Dulcie (1936-) Patricia Clarke , 2014 single work companion entry
— Appears in: A Companion to the Australian Media : B 2014; (p. 68-69)
1 Allan, Stella May (1871-1962) Patricia Clarke , 2014 single work companion entry
— Appears in: A Companion to the Australian Media : A 2014; (p. 18)
1 Queensland's First Professional Woman Journalist : Mary Hannay Foott Patricia Clarke , 2014 single work biography
— Appears in: Queensland History Journal , February vol. 22 no. 4 2014; (p. 303-315)
1 7 y separately published work icon Eilean Giblin : A Feminist between the Wars Patricia Clarke , Clayton : Monash University Publishing , 2013 6581345 2013 single work biography

'Eilean Giblin arrived in Australia from England in 1919 with a shipload of war brides, almost certainly the only woman not wearing a wedding ring. She believed both husband and wife should have rings or neither. She brought with her a commitment to women’s rights and social justice developed through the suffrage movement and left-wing social and political circles. During the next three decades, in three Australian cities, she worked to advance her feminist and humanitarian ideals.

'In Hobart in the 1920s she campaigned for ‘equal citizenship’; she was the first woman appointed to a Tasmanian hospital board, and she represented Tasmania at the 1923 International Woman Suffrage Congress in Rome. In Melbourne in the 1930s she led a committee that achieved the long sought goal of a non-denominational university women’s college. And in Canberra during World War II she was one of a small minority of Australians who championed the cause of the enemy aliens, many of them Jewish, deported from Britain on the ship Dunera, and she set off on a lone 500 kilometre journey to investigate their internment camp conditions.

'Patricia Clarke draws on original records and evidence, such as Giblin’s diary kept during World War II – a unique social record and a powerful witness to the immense suffering and futility of war – to portray the courageous public and private life of this unconventional feminist.' (Publisher's blurb)

2 A Novel Take on Canberra Patricia Clarke , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Canberra Historical Journal , May no. 68 2012; (p. 15-22)

— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 22 September 2012; (p. 10-11)
1 Bushmen's Barbeque Patricia Clarke , 2011 single work short story
— Appears in: 100 Stories for Queensland : In Aid of the Survivors of the Queensland Floods 2011; (p. 57-59)
1 Tasma in a Harem : A 'Lost' Story Patricia Clarke , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Margin , April no. 80 2010; (p. 15-22)

Patricia Clarks writes of her search and discovery of Jessie Couvreur's articles 'Women in a Harem'.

1 Rosa Praed's Lifeline to Her Australian Past Patricia Clarke , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Margin , July/August no. 78 2009; (p. 5-15) Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism , no. 319 2016; (p. 304-400)
1 James Calvert, Louisa Atkinson and the Plains of Promise : The Story Behind Louisa Atkinson's Last Novel Patricia Clarke , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Margin , April no. 77 2009; (p. 20-34)

Patricia Clarke argues that the Queensland scenes of Louisa Atkinson's novel Tressa's Resolve are 'clearly based on her husband's [James Calvert's] recollections of the harsh nature of the country he travelled over during his historic fifteen months journey to Port Essington [with Ludwig Leichhardt in 1844-45] and on his scepticism of the grandiose plans for settlement, particularly of the district that was deceptively named 'The Plains of Promise'.' (28)

1 A Note on the Henry Handel Richardson Society Tour Patricia Clarke , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: Margin , November no. 76 2008; (p. 36)
1 Literary Links to a Nineteenth-Century Murder Patricia Clarke , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Margin , April no. 74 2008; (p. 8-18)
1 1 The Paradox of Exile Patricia Clarke , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Landscapes of Exile: Once Perilous, Now Safe 2008; (p. 19-30)

'Queensland-born novelist Rosa Praed's departure for London in 1876 at the age of 24 is usually regarded as a liberating move. She was exchanging life as a squatter's wife on an isolated station for the established comfort and social standing of her husband's English upper middle class family. It also opened up the prospect of finding a market for the stories that were swirling in her head. For nearly sixty years until her death in 1935 she lived in England or Europe making only one brief visit to Australia in the first months of 1895. Exile is not a concept usually associated with such a move.

'This paper [explores] indications in her writing that point to "the unhealable rift" that followed this separation from her physical and spiritual home. The most important is her constant, almost obsessive, return over a period of more than thirty-five years to the sites of her childhood and young adulthood as settings for close to twenty books. The explanation that she was exploiting a demand for colonial colour and adventure among English readers is inadequate in the face of this recurrent, compulsive dredging of memories. [This paper argues] that her frequent return to early memories of the Australian landscape, Aboriginal/white frontier wars, political events and colonial social mores indicates a loss that was never assuaged. Her memories were reinforced by material she received from her Australian relatives, often actively sought.'

Source: Landscapes of Exile conference website, http://www.scu.edu.au/research/cpsj/landscapesofexiles/abstracts1.html#PatriciaClarke
Sighted: 02/04/2008

1 Anna Maria Bunn and The Guardian Patricia Clarke , 2007 single work biography
— Appears in: Margin , November no. 73 2007; (p. 18-21)
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