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By permission of Laurie Duggan.
Laurie Duggan Laurie Duggan i(A18339 works by) (birth name: Laurence James Duggan)
Born: Established: 1949 South Melbourne, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria, ;
Gender: Male
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Works By

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1 Coastal i "rain hits the glass", Laurie Duggan , 2021 single work poetry
— Appears in: Social Alternatives , January vol. 40 no. 1 2021; (p. 9)
1 Words i "a poem is a house into which", Laurie Duggan , 2021 single work poetry
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 434 2021; (p. 59)
1 Melancholia, i "or the light reflected off metal structures on the roof of the laboratory", Laurie Duggan , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Anthology of Australian Prose Poetry 2020; (p. 70)
1 1 Georges Seurat i "motion is predicated on the interaction of colour", Laurie Duggan , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 14 November 2020; (p. 18)
1 3 y separately published work icon Homer Street Laurie Duggan , Artarmon : Giramondo Publishing , 2020 18796934 2020 selected work poetry

'A leading figure in Australian poetry, Laurie Duggan has been long celebrated for his vividly sensed observations of everyday life and his minimal and urbane style. This is his first publication with Giramondo.

'Laurie Duggan’s new collection begins with poems written during his last year in Britain, in Faversham, a market town in east Kent, with others written on a visit to Australia in 2016 and after his return in October 2018. They contribute to two ongoing sequences, ‘Allotments’, and ‘Blue Hills’, which alludes to the long-running domestic radio serial of the same name. These are made up of the brief haiku-like poems that Duggan has made his own: impressions, mysterious conjunctions, oddities and contradictions, the small details that express large forces, as in his observations of the landscape, the weather, domestic and suburban settings. In the final section, ‘Afterimages’, Duggan offers descriptions of paintings and comments on artists, and sometimes imaginary constructions of what a particular artist might have done, but the real point is to create poems which stand like art works in their own right.' (Publication summary)

1 Blue Hills 103 i "wit wit wit", Laurie Duggan , 2019 single work poetry
— Appears in: Rabbit , no. 28 2019; (p. 74-75)
1 2 y separately published work icon Selected Poems 1971-2017 Laurie Duggan , Exeter : Shearsman Books , 2018 19261021 2018 selected work poetry '"Duggan's is a poetry that determines to surprise: almost daring a reader to exclaim: you wrote like this about that?" -Alan Wearne, Sydney Morning Herald

'"I think of how Pound defined the image as `that which presents an intellectual and emotional complex in an instant of time'; and, still being thoroughly sane back in 1913, he went on to say: `the natural object is always the adequate symbol'. Such an imagist doctrine has always been at the heart of Laurie Duggan's sharp-eyed work, ever since the days when he was at the core of a group who got together at Monash, back in the 1960s." -Chris Wallace-Crabbe

'Duggan's poetry has the virtue that it never `abandons the local'. Like Paul Blackburn-a poet Duggan manifestly admires-he builds his work out of what he finds in, on or about the premises." -Tony Baker, Jacket

'"How ferociously Duggan attends both to the there of the world . . . and the here of writing." -John Latta, Isola di Rifiu' (Publication summary)
1 ‘A Homemade World’ : On the Dandenong Line Laurie Duggan , 2018 single work prose
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 February no. 84 2018;

'Sometime in 1953 my parents bought a house in Clayton (Victoria, Australia), then on the edge of south-east Melbourne. We moved there from a decidedly different environment: the guest house that my Grandmother owned. This was on Beaconsfield Parade in South Melbourne. In those years that suburb was largely working class with connections to the Port Melbourne wharf and the further dockside territory along the Yarra River. This guesthouse and the country around Ensay in the Tambo valley of East Gippsland where my father was born were ghost presences as I was growing up – imaginaries of an existence I might have had (urban / rural). We would visit my uncle and aunt in Ensay (travelling by train and bus until around 1960 when we finally owned a car) and we would venture into the inner suburbs occasionally where I would get to look at the ‘slums’. I’m not sure what significance these places had for my parents or even why they wanted to take me there. It could have been as a ‘this could have happened to you’ lesson, though I suspect this was not the case. The places we visited may have had more of an affirming effect for my parents. For me, the inner suburbs were simply ‘picturesque’. In art classes at Huntingdale High School I would often draw or paint decaying buildings from the images I had taken on my box Brownie camera. These were sketchy romantic visions lifted probably from the work of Sydney artists like Sali Herman or Donald Friend (encountered in the library rather than the art gallery).'  (Introduction)

1 Transcription Haiku i "Japanese compilers", Laurie Duggan , 2018 single work poetry
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 23 2018; (p. 15)
1 The Body Politic i "Get off the fence", Laurie Duggan , 2018 single work poetry
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 23 2018; (p. 15)
1 y separately published work icon No Particular Place to Go Laurie Duggan , Bristol : Shearsman Books , 2017 20825212 2017 selected work poetry

'"Sceptical as I am about anti-poetry, of which there is a lot around and which can assume many different forms, the fully formed poems are not the only writing I can value in a book like this. There is too much wit, absurdity, and sheer verbal craft to be ignored." --Peter Riley

'"We've all seen how, after a night of drones, an experimental poet comes out to read, wielding the vernacular, and the room lights up. There's laughter, joy, play, confusion, a rmation, all the things that make poetry what it is. This is why poets in the generation including Duggan, Pam Brown and Ken Bolton are so accessible to readers and listeners, because of their interest in the page-as-field (perhaps an 'Olsonesque' sense), and the everyday vernacular. The only reason Conventional Verse Culture still claims to own the (ever-elusive) 'average reader' is because of the structures and frameworks in place that tell people they do. This is not because people on the street speak like CVC." --A J Carruthers' (Publication summary)

1 A Northern Winter i "bitter gall in afternoon light", Laurie Duggan , 2016 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Best Australian Poems 2016 2016; (p. 57-61) Cordite Poetry Review , no. 53.0 2016;
1 Basil King i "The face could be", Laurie Duggan , 2016 single work poetry
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , September no. 5 2016;
1 Jacopo Bassano i "Light breaks (or fades) over a distant mountain", Laurie Duggan , 2016 single work poetry
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , September no. 5 2016;
1 Gustave Courbet i "The cliffs of Ornans appear", Laurie Duggan , 2016 single work poetry
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , September no. 5 2016;
1 Alexander Calder i "ballet shoes point upward", Laurie Duggan , 2016 single work poetry
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , September no. 5 2016;
1 Frank Auerbach i "down Primrose Hill", Laurie Duggan , 2016 single work poetry
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , September no. 5 2016;
1 Peter Lanyon i "those quadrilaterals,", Laurie Duggan , 2016 single work poetry
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , September no. 5 2016;
1 Six Afterimages Laurie Duggan , 2016 sequence poetry
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , September no. 5 2016; The Best Australian Poems 2017 2017; (p. 53-53)
1 Laurie Duggan 8 : England and Elsewhere, 2006-2011 Laurie Duggan , 2015 extract diary
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , September no. 3 2015;
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