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Michael Farrell Michael Farrell i(A3320 works by) (a.k.a. Michael John Farrell)
Also writes as: 'Dodi ‘Dodo’ Malley' ; 'Bradley Malley-Trushott' ; 'Veronica Malley'
Born: Established: 1965 Bombala, Bombala - Delegate area, Cooma - Snowy - Bombala area, Southeastern NSW, New South Wales, ;
Gender: Male
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Works By

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1 ‘Is You Is …’ V ‘Passionfruit’ i "We bring the horses back to their own fields because we like", Michael Farrell , 2021 single work poetry
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 438 2021; (p. 48)
1 Kerosene Honey i "An I is a poor stick and useful because of this a renderer", Michael Farrell , 2021 single work poetry
— Appears in: Island , no. 163 2021; (p. 106-107)
1 ‘If You Don’t Mind My Arsing’ Michael Farrell , 2021 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , November 2021;

— Review of The Manifold Marty Hiatt , 2016 selected work poetry
1 In Fields i "The generosity of the sky is too well known to even mention", Michael Farrell , 2021 single work poetry
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Journal , vol. 11 no. 1 2021; (p. 30-31)
1 Karma Chameleon Michael Farrell , 2021 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , July 2021;

— Review of Chatelaine Bonny Cassidy , 2017 selected work poetry

'Bonny Cassidy’s Chatelaine is a gift to a reviewer that doesn’t want to paraphrase poems, for a reader that doesn’t need such summarising. Rather, its line-up of loosely framed lyrics offers opportunities for thinking and (re)reading. Cassidy’s figure of the chatelaine, or key-keeper, lives, or moves, somewhere in between the reader and the poet. There are keys being kept but they are not in a predetermined place, nor, I suspect, are there any predetermined keyholes either. Whether or not this seems like hedge-betting will reflect your idea of what literature is for, or what it does.' (Introduction)

1 Apple Tree i "It has no idea what beauty is, till its first blossom", Michael Farrell , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: In Your Hands 2020; (p. 31)
1 The Snow Depardieu i "waiting for the petrol soft to", Michael Farrell , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Anthology of Australian Prose Poetry 2020; (p. 77)
1 Lorikeet Inducement i "As the wise woman said there was a path to the left which", Michael Farrell , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain : An Australian Journal of Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics , October vol. 7 no. 2 2020;
1 Leaves to the Imagination i "Standing in the shade of a lion statue or ode to the temporary", Michael Farrell , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: Poetry in Lockdown 2020;
1 Grammatical Theme And ‘Dancing Queen’ i "Light and dark alternate. There are no clubs. Or the poem is a club. The song is", Michael Farrell , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Journal , vol. 10 no. 1 2020; (p. 63)
1 Measure i "a digital rule can't be broken", Michael Farrell , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: Island , no. 160 2020; (p. 87)
1 Names, Names, Names! : Experimental Mini-biographies Michael Farrell , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 423 2020; (p. 59)

— Review of Shorter Lives John Scott , 2020 selected work poetry
'John A. Scott's Shorter Lives is written at an intersection between experimental fiction, biography, and poetry. It inherits aspects of earlier works, such as preoccupations with sex and France. As the title indicates, it narrates mini-biographies of famous writers — Arthur Rimbaud, Virginia Stephen (Woolf), Andre Breton, and Mina Loy — and one painter — Pablo Picasso —with interludes devoted to the lesser-known poet Charles Cros and the art dealer Ambroise Vollard. The narratives are largely distilled from more conventional prose sources. Scott gives himself poetic licence to fictionalise, and anachronise: Paul Cezanne's collection of twentieth-century American paintings, for example.' (Introduction) 
1 Arcades Project Michael Farrell , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: Meanjin , June vol. 79 no. 2 2020; (p. 79)
1 Rebellious Tropes Michael Farrell , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , May 2020;

— Review of Where Only the Sky Hung Before Toby Fitch , 2019 selected work poetry

'In an indignant letter, written on 12 December 1918, to S. Nevile Foster, editor of Land and Water, the novelist and former ship’s captain, Joseph Conrad, questions the suitability of the illustration of his story ‘Rescue’, which they were about to publish. He begins by describing himself ‘as an artist in another medium’, and remarking that he had ‘always been treated by his illustrators with a certain amount of consideration … with that loyalty which is due from a conscientious artist to the conceptions of another’. He questions whether the illustrator of ‘Rescue’ has ‘ever seen a yacht’s gig’ (a type of boat)? Or a man standing in one? Or any boat that looked like the one in the illustration? Had he ‘looked with an artist’s eye ever in his life at the leech of a sail, either full or aback, the most definite and expressive line in the world? The whole thing’, Conrad adds, ‘is false enough to set one’s teeth on edge; and of unpardonable ugliness … There are ways of rendering the luminous quality of a tropical night & there was no reason to cram ugliness into the very sky.’' (Introduction(

1 Uncrushed Local Thought Michael Farrell , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , February 2020;

— Review of Empirical Lisa Gorton , 2019 selected work poetry

'Is colonialism a failed project? This is not a simple question. While contemporary oppositional discourse – any thinking that supports moves towards post- and decoloniality – rejects the colonial project, an assessment of its failure might mean that its aims weren’t realised, or that it has come to the end of its life, like a light bulb or bank, or prime ministership, or site that can no longer be accessed, or document that won’t load. I’m writing this unable to check my email on my computer, unsure if this is a browser failure, but knowing it’s my own failure, in not keeping up to date, not so much with the colonial (although the colonial, like all extant concepts, is now inseparable from the digital), but with Empire more broadly speaking.' (Introduction)

1 3 y separately published work icon Family Trees Michael Farrell , Artarmon : Giramondo Publishing , 2020 18446565 2020 selected work poetry

'In Family Trees, Michael Farrell continues to question how humans relate – to each other, and to the nonhuman, the worlds of animals, plants and objects. Inheritance can be a heavy legacy but in Michael’s expansive rendering it frees itself: how do we connect? Through affection, and through sharing, swapping and listening. Family Trees sees the return of familiar characters such as Pope Pinocchio, alongside new figures such as Lord Marmalade, Cherry the ‘Kiama Scammer’ and Adam, a paranoid country English teacher. Presented in filmic scenarios, these characters are often busily thinking, while also participating in more mundane forms of activity – gossip and sleep and work. The book includes a number of South Coast poems that take a poking interest in how language blooms off-track. It’s about memory, fantasy and the possibilities of living in conceptual space. Anything that has roots can be a family tree.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

1 Autopoiesis i "He would do what he could while still a viable organisation", Michael Farrell , 2019 single work poetry
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Journal , vol. 9 no. 1 2019; (p. 44)
1 Acts i "Unemployed man writes poem in one room slab hut", Michael Farrell , 2019 single work poetry
— Appears in: Stilts , June no. 4 2019;
1 7 y separately published work icon Ashbery Mode Michael Farrell (editor), Hawaii : Tinfish Press , 2019 18223569 2019 anthology poetry

'Poetry. LGBTQIA Studies. When the editor of Tinfish Press wrote on a Facebook comment stream that she was interested in publishing work from the Pacific that responded to Ashbery's poetry, she did not expect Michael Farrell to respond that he already had such a manuscript in hand. ASHBERY MODE is that precise anthology, one that includes dozens of Australia's best contemporary poets writing in the "mode" of Ashbery. Like his New York School colleague and friend, Frank O'Hara, Ashbery proved crucial in relaxing the strictures of Australian poetry, releasing it from its formal and tonal bonds. It's wonderful to see Ashbery transmogrify into a local Australian poet. This book is a companion piece to Eileen R. Tabios's WITNESS IN THE CONVEX MIRROR (Tinfish Press, 2019) and, like her book, shows how poetic influence gets activated across national and oceanic boundaries, as well as how source texts can open up into radically new perspectives.' (Publication summary)

1 Living in a Fridge Michael Farrell , 2019 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Growing Up Queer in Australia 2019; (p. 176-181)
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