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y separately published work icon The Makers single work   novel   young adult   science fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 1987... 1987 The Makers
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Two young warriors, Jeth and Rae, are under the control of mutant masters. Through refusing to kill each other, they are exiled from the Keep, but are able to provide hope for a new generation opposed to violence.'

Source: Blurb.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Other Formats

  • Also sound recording.

Works about this Work

Children of the Apocalypse Roslyn Weaver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film : A Critical Study 2011; (p. 108-134)

This chapter explores apocalypse in children's literature with reference to literary attitudes to children, nature and dystopia. Examinations of works by Lee Harding, Victor Kelleher, and John Marsden then focus on how these writers adapt apocalyptic themes for a juvenile audience. Their novels display tyranny, large-scale catastrophe, invasion, and children in danger, and their apocalyptic settings reveal anxieties about isolation, invasion, Indigenous land rights and colonization. (108)

An Interview with Victor Kelleher Steven Paulsen (interviewer), 1994 single work interview
— Appears in: Sirius , February no. 4 1994; (p. 24-29)
A very long way from 'Billabong' Heather Scutter , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , April vol. 2 no. 1 1991; (p. 30-35)
Living with Ourselves : Recent Australian Science Fiction for Children and Young People Maureen Nimon , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Children's Literature Association Quarterly , vol. 15 no. 4 1990; (p. 185-189)
Nimon observes that Australian science fiction for children tends to present futuristic narratives that are 'earthbound' rather than 'launching into the void between the stars or touching down on remote and wonderous planets' (185). She claims that writers of juvenile science fiction 'find Australia itself to be a challenging terrain...a continent whose people are neither comfortable nor assured in their possession of it' (185). Following a discussion of novels by Lee Harding (Displaced Persons, Waiting for the End of the World), Victor Kelleher (Taronga, The Makers), and Gillian Rubinstein (Beyond the Labyrinth, Skymaze and Space Demons), Nimon claims that as well as the tendency of Australian science fiction for children to remain earthbound, there is a pervasive theme of individualization, 'where the dangers encountered and the foes met are the powers of our own desires and weaknesses; we battle to control our unruly selves' and as such, 'the future lies in our own hands' (188).
Speculative Fiction for Australian Children Ann L. Grieve , 1989 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 108 1989; (p. 22-25)
Untitled Grant Stone , 1988 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 3 no. 2 1988; (p. 33)

— Review of The Makers Victor Kelleher , 1987 single work novel
Story of a Violent Society Shows the Way to Peace 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 9 December 1989; (p. 14)

— Review of The Makers Victor Kelleher , 1987 single work novel
Nude Boy in Cover-Up Mark Macleod , 1988 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 2-3 April 1988;

— Review of Where the Forest Meets the Sea Jeannie Baker , 1987 single work picture book ; So Much to Tell You John Marsden , 1987 single work novel ; Pheasant and Kingfisher Catherine H. Berndt , 1987 single work picture book ; The Long Red Scarf Nette Hilton , 1987 single work picture book ; The Landing : A Night of Birds Katherine Scholes , 1987 single work children's fiction ; Deezle Boy Eleanor Spence , 1987 single work novel ; My Place : The Story of Australia from Now to Then Nadia Wheatley , Donna Rawlins , 1987 single work picture book ; Digging to China Donna Rawlins , 1988 single work picture book ; Obernewtyn Isobelle Carmody , 1987 single work novel ; A Paddock of Poems Max Fatchen , 1987 selected work poetry ; Looking Out For Sampson Libby Hathorn , 1987 single work children's fiction ; The Makers Victor Kelleher , 1987 single work novel ; Birk, the Berserker Robin Klein , 1987 single work children's fiction ; Tucking Mummy In Morag Loh , 1987 single work picture book
Untitled Howard George , 1988 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , vol. 32 no. 1 1988; (p. 47-48)

— Review of The Makers Victor Kelleher , 1987 single work novel
Living with Ourselves : Recent Australian Science Fiction for Children and Young People Maureen Nimon , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Children's Literature Association Quarterly , vol. 15 no. 4 1990; (p. 185-189)
Nimon observes that Australian science fiction for children tends to present futuristic narratives that are 'earthbound' rather than 'launching into the void between the stars or touching down on remote and wonderous planets' (185). She claims that writers of juvenile science fiction 'find Australia itself to be a challenging terrain...a continent whose people are neither comfortable nor assured in their possession of it' (185). Following a discussion of novels by Lee Harding (Displaced Persons, Waiting for the End of the World), Victor Kelleher (Taronga, The Makers), and Gillian Rubinstein (Beyond the Labyrinth, Skymaze and Space Demons), Nimon claims that as well as the tendency of Australian science fiction for children to remain earthbound, there is a pervasive theme of individualization, 'where the dangers encountered and the foes met are the powers of our own desires and weaknesses; we battle to control our unruly selves' and as such, 'the future lies in our own hands' (188).
An Interview with Victor Kelleher Steven Paulsen (interviewer), 1994 single work interview
— Appears in: Sirius , February no. 4 1994; (p. 24-29)
Children of the Apocalypse Roslyn Weaver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film : A Critical Study 2011; (p. 108-134)

This chapter explores apocalypse in children's literature with reference to literary attitudes to children, nature and dystopia. Examinations of works by Lee Harding, Victor Kelleher, and John Marsden then focus on how these writers adapt apocalyptic themes for a juvenile audience. Their novels display tyranny, large-scale catastrophe, invasion, and children in danger, and their apocalyptic settings reveal anxieties about isolation, invasion, Indigenous land rights and colonization. (108)

A very long way from 'Billabong' Heather Scutter , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , April vol. 2 no. 1 1991; (p. 30-35)
Children's Book Council Awards Jo Goodman , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 105 1988; (p. 26-28)
Last amended 12 Jun 2014 16:25:14
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