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image of person or book cover 9156302392410607552.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y separately published work icon My Girragundji single work   children's fiction   children's   humour  
Is part of Girragundji Trilogy Meme McDonald , Boori Pryor , 1998 series - author children's fiction novel (number 1 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 1998... 1998 My Girragundji
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Alive with humour, this is the vivid story of a boy growing up between two worlds. With Girragundji, the little green tree frog, he finds the courage to face the Hairyman, the bullies at school, and also learns the lessons of manhood that his father teaches him. A young boy growing up in a large family and caught between Koori and white worlds, finds his attachment to a little tree frog gives him the courage to face his fears.' Source: Libraries Australia.

Exhibitions

6943604
10627234
10626492
12387857
12382350

Adaptations

My Girragundji Chris Canute , 2001 single work drama children's

Reading Australia

Reading Australia

This work has Reading Australia teaching resources.

Unit Suitable For:

AC: Years 5 and 6 (NSW Stage 3)

General Capabilities

Information and communication technology, Intercultural understanding, Literacy

Cross-curriculum Priorities

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

Notes

  • Included in the 1999 White Raven's Catalogue compiled by the International Youth Library in Munich, Germany.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • St Leonards, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 1998 .
      image of person or book cover 9156302392410607552.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 74p.
      Description: illus.
      Reprinted: 2002
      Note/s:
      • Photographs by Meme McDonald.
      ISBN: 1864488182
      Series: y separately published work icon A Little Ark Book Allen and Unwin (publisher), Crows Nest : Allen and Unwin , 1988- 11639330 1988 series - publisher

Other Formats

  • Also sound recording.
  • Also braille.

Works about this Work

From Colonial Superstition to the Hairyman : Aboriginality and the Politics of Race Juliet O'Conor , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations Into Children's Literature , vol. 20 no. 2 2010; (p. 11-22)
'The misconceptions of Indigenous incapacity and pastoral welfarism evident in the mid century texts are reversed by the end of the century and the texts that have made the same possible are discussed. Characterization of the Indigenous protagonists in each publication reveals much about changing perceptions of Aboriginality.' (Author's abstract)
Are You Talking to Me? : Hailing the Reader in Indigenous Children's Literature Penelope Davie , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 16 no. 2 2006; (p. 112-117)
This analysis discusses two indigenous authored children's texts, My Girragundji (Meme McDonald and Boori Pryor) and Tell Me Why (Robyn Templeton and Sarah Jackson), in relation to critical strategies, audience address and textual authorisation. In particular, Davie looks at 'paratexts' - the material that comes before and after a text, including blurbs, introductions, acknowledgements, titles, covers, art - as an interpellation device (112). Drawing upon the concept of interpellation, or the way in which the subject is addressed by the 'authority of the state', Davie argues that the paratexts of contemporary Indigenous texts offer an 'entry point' for the direct voice of the author who can 'hail readers' without the mediation of white voices, which (in the pas) have not only spoken for Indigenous people, but had the power to police their voices and frame the narrative in ways that suited a non-Indigenous audience (116).
[Review] My Girragundji Alison Lawrence , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 14 no. 2 2000; (p. 63)

— Review of My Girragundji Meme McDonald , Boori Pryor , 1998 single work children's fiction
Many Grandparents Ago Liz Thomas , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Autumn vol. 8 no. 1 2000; (p. 14-16)
[Review] My Girragundji Alison Lawrence , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 13 no. 2 1999; (p. 31)

— Review of My Girragundji Meme McDonald , Boori Pryor , 1998 single work children's fiction
[Review] My Girragundji Jo Goodman , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 43 no. 2 1999; (p. 36)

— Review of My Girragundji Meme McDonald , Boori Pryor , 1998 single work children's fiction
[Review] My Girragundji Neville Barnard , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , November vol. 13 no. 5 1998; (p. 34)

— Review of My Girragundji Meme McDonald , Boori Pryor , 1998 single work children's fiction
[Review] My Girragundji Alison Lawrence , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 13 no. 2 1999; (p. 31)

— Review of My Girragundji Meme McDonald , Boori Pryor , 1998 single work children's fiction
[Review] My Girragundji Alison Lawrence , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 14 no. 2 2000; (p. 63)

— Review of My Girragundji Meme McDonald , Boori Pryor , 1998 single work children's fiction
Finding Courage for Facing Fears 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 5 May no. 200 1999; (p. 43)

— Review of My Girragundji Meme McDonald , Boori Pryor , 1998 single work children's fiction
The Children's Book Council of Australia Annual Awards 1999 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 43 no. 3 1999; (p. 3-12)
CBC Acceptance Speeches : Meme McDonald and Boori Monty Pryor Meme McDonald , 1999 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 43 no. 4 1999; (p. 3)
y separately published work icon Boori and Meme : The Process of Collaborative Writing. Bendigo : Video Education Australasia , 1999 Z1287602 1999 single work criticism 'Authors Boori Pryor and Meme McDonald discuss how they collaborated in writing Maybe Tomorrow and My Girragundji. Shows how the combination of Aboriginal and Western cultures is explored to create a spirit of cooperation, understanding and reconciliation.' Source: Libraries Australia.
Are You Talking to Me? : Hailing the Reader in Indigenous Children's Literature Penelope Davie , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 16 no. 2 2006; (p. 112-117)
This analysis discusses two indigenous authored children's texts, My Girragundji (Meme McDonald and Boori Pryor) and Tell Me Why (Robyn Templeton and Sarah Jackson), in relation to critical strategies, audience address and textual authorisation. In particular, Davie looks at 'paratexts' - the material that comes before and after a text, including blurbs, introductions, acknowledgements, titles, covers, art - as an interpellation device (112). Drawing upon the concept of interpellation, or the way in which the subject is addressed by the 'authority of the state', Davie argues that the paratexts of contemporary Indigenous texts offer an 'entry point' for the direct voice of the author who can 'hail readers' without the mediation of white voices, which (in the pas) have not only spoken for Indigenous people, but had the power to police their voices and frame the narrative in ways that suited a non-Indigenous audience (116).
From Colonial Superstition to the Hairyman : Aboriginality and the Politics of Race Juliet O'Conor , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations Into Children's Literature , vol. 20 no. 2 2010; (p. 11-22)
'The misconceptions of Indigenous incapacity and pastoral welfarism evident in the mid century texts are reversed by the end of the century and the texts that have made the same possible are discussed. Characterization of the Indigenous protagonists in each publication reveals much about changing perceptions of Aboriginality.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 20 Nov 2017 14:12:49
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