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Issue Details: First known date: 2002... 2002 My Side of the Bridge : The Life Story of Veronica Brodie as Told to Mary-Anne Gale
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Kent Town, Norwood, Payneham & St Peters area, Adelaide - North / North East, Adelaide, South Australia,:Wakefield Press , 2002 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Coorongi"Land of my father's people", Leila D. Rankine , single work poetry (p. 36-37)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Kent Town, Norwood, Payneham & St Peters area, Adelaide - North / North East, Adelaide, South Australia,: Wakefield Press , 2002 .
      Extent: x, 189 p., [8]p. of platesp.
      Description: illus., ports
      ISBN: 186254557X

Works about this Work

Negotiating the “Drunken Aborigine”: Alcohol in Indigenous Autobiography Sam Dalgarno , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 42 no. 1 2018; (p. 51-64)

'This article approaches the question of how Aboriginal Australians describe their own experiences of drinking alcohol, sometimes to excess, and how they recover, through a reading of seven autobiographies alongside the scholarship on Aboriginal drinking. The evidence contained in these life stories stresses personal factors and adds to the picture we glean from the scholarship, whether academic or governmental, epidemiological, anthropological or historical, which explains Aboriginal drinking habits in more social terms. Thus, the autobiographies themselves make an important intervention into the scholarship on Aboriginal drinking. Beyond this, negotiating with the stereotype of the “drunken Aborigine” is unavoidable for Aboriginal people who write about their drinking and these autobiographies represent a challenge to this popular image. This article examines a previously unexamined discourse on Aboriginal drinking that goes some way towards undermining the public representation of a drunken Aboriginal culture while simultaneously giving individual Aboriginal Australians greater voice in describing their past and current experiences.' (Publication abstract)

Anti-Nativism in Australian Indigenous Literature Teresa Podemska-Abt , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kultura Historia Globalizacja , no. 7 2010; (p. 53-64)
'What in today's literary discourse are the reality and the world created by the words: nativism, nativity, the native, native? Why do we still speak and communicate with them and use them in different contexts, even though we know that these words often carry a negative emotional meaning load, taking us to spaces, times, and experiences of colonial suffering, despite their basis in academic arguments. In Australia such issues have been addressed by many Indigenous writers, amongst them — M. Langton, A. Moreton- Robinson, Mudrooroo, C. Watego, T. Birch, F. Bayet — Charlton, to name just a few.' (Author's introduction)
Public Occasions, Indigenous Selves : Three Ngarrindjeri Autobiographies Tim Rowse , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Aboriginal History , vol. 30 no. 2006; (p. 187-207)
Tim Rowse writes: 'One of the tasks of Aboriginal autobiography is to invite reflection on the relationship between widely available public representations of "the Aboriginal experience" and that which the autobiographer understands to be unique to him/herself' (p. 190). Rowse explores this relationship in three Ngarrindjeri autobiographies.
Narrative Lives and Human Rights : Stolen Generation Narratives and the Ethics of Recognition Kay Schaffer , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 3 no. 2004; (p. 5-25)
Indigenous Life Stories Jennifer Jones , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Life Writing , vol. 1 no. 2 2004; (p. 209-218)
Untitled Robyn Tucker , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , July no. 17 2003;

— Review of My Side of the Bridge : The Life Story of Veronica Brodie as Told to Mary-Anne Gale Veronica Brodie , Mary-Anne Gale , 2002 single work autobiography
Untitled Robyn Tucker , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 79 2003; (p. 185-187)

— Review of My Side of the Bridge : The Life Story of Veronica Brodie as Told to Mary-Anne Gale Veronica Brodie , Mary-Anne Gale , 2002 single work autobiography
Indigenous Life Stories Jennifer Jones , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Life Writing , vol. 1 no. 2 2004; (p. 209-218)
Narrative Lives and Human Rights : Stolen Generation Narratives and the Ethics of Recognition Kay Schaffer , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 3 no. 2004; (p. 5-25)
Public Occasions, Indigenous Selves : Three Ngarrindjeri Autobiographies Tim Rowse , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Aboriginal History , vol. 30 no. 2006; (p. 187-207)
Tim Rowse writes: 'One of the tasks of Aboriginal autobiography is to invite reflection on the relationship between widely available public representations of "the Aboriginal experience" and that which the autobiographer understands to be unique to him/herself' (p. 190). Rowse explores this relationship in three Ngarrindjeri autobiographies.
Anti-Nativism in Australian Indigenous Literature Teresa Podemska-Abt , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kultura Historia Globalizacja , no. 7 2010; (p. 53-64)
'What in today's literary discourse are the reality and the world created by the words: nativism, nativity, the native, native? Why do we still speak and communicate with them and use them in different contexts, even though we know that these words often carry a negative emotional meaning load, taking us to spaces, times, and experiences of colonial suffering, despite their basis in academic arguments. In Australia such issues have been addressed by many Indigenous writers, amongst them — M. Langton, A. Moreton- Robinson, Mudrooroo, C. Watego, T. Birch, F. Bayet — Charlton, to name just a few.' (Author's introduction)
Negotiating the “Drunken Aborigine”: Alcohol in Indigenous Autobiography Sam Dalgarno , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 42 no. 1 2018; (p. 51-64)

'This article approaches the question of how Aboriginal Australians describe their own experiences of drinking alcohol, sometimes to excess, and how they recover, through a reading of seven autobiographies alongside the scholarship on Aboriginal drinking. The evidence contained in these life stories stresses personal factors and adds to the picture we glean from the scholarship, whether academic or governmental, epidemiological, anthropological or historical, which explains Aboriginal drinking habits in more social terms. Thus, the autobiographies themselves make an important intervention into the scholarship on Aboriginal drinking. Beyond this, negotiating with the stereotype of the “drunken Aborigine” is unavoidable for Aboriginal people who write about their drinking and these autobiographies represent a challenge to this popular image. This article examines a previously unexamined discourse on Aboriginal drinking that goes some way towards undermining the public representation of a drunken Aboriginal culture while simultaneously giving individual Aboriginal Australians greater voice in describing their past and current experiences.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 29 Jul 2010 16:51:34
Subjects:
  • Hindmarsh Island, Victor Harbor - Goolwa area, Fleurieu Peninsula - Lake Alexandrina, South Australia,
  • c
    India,
    c
    South Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
  • ca. 1940-2000
Settings:
  • Fleurieu Peninsula - Lake Alexandrina, South Australia,
  • Adelaide, South Australia,
  • c
    India,
    c
    South Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
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