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form y separately published work icon Dreaming in Motion series - publisher   film/TV  
Is part of Dreaming in Motion : Celebrating Australia's Indigenous Filmmakers Australian Film Commission , 2007 reference non-fiction
Issue Details: First known date: 2002... 2002 Dreaming in Motion
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'Films developed and produced in association with the Indigenous Branch of the Australian Film Commission.' (Source: Dreaming in Motion: Celebrating Australia's Indigenous Filmmakers, 2007, p68)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Sustaining Grief in Japanese Story and Dreaming in Motion Felicity Collins , Therese Davis , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Cinema after Mabo 2004; (p. 172-204)
The proposal presented by Collins and Davis throughout this book is 'that the post-Mabo era in Australian cinema can be read through the metaphor of backtracking. This intermittent activity of reviewing, mulling over and renewing icons, landscapes, characters and stories defines contemporary Australian national cinema.' The conclusion that the authors draw from their analysis of Australian cinema is that 'in the post-Mabo context, this brooding passion for raking the national repetoire of icons serves as a vernacular mode of collective mourning, a process involving both grief-work and testimony.' Source : Australian Cinema after Mabo (2004).
Sustaining Grief in Japanese Story and Dreaming in Motion Felicity Collins , Therese Davis , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Cinema after Mabo 2004; (p. 172-204)
The proposal presented by Collins and Davis throughout this book is 'that the post-Mabo era in Australian cinema can be read through the metaphor of backtracking. This intermittent activity of reviewing, mulling over and renewing icons, landscapes, characters and stories defines contemporary Australian national cinema.' The conclusion that the authors draw from their analysis of Australian cinema is that 'in the post-Mabo context, this brooding passion for raking the national repetoire of icons serves as a vernacular mode of collective mourning, a process involving both grief-work and testimony.' Source : Australian Cinema after Mabo (2004).
Last amended 15 May 2009 14:58:34
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