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Issue Details: First known date: 2009... vol. 24 no. 4 September 2009 of Magpies : Talking About Books for Children est. 1986-1995 Magpies: Talking About Books for Children
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Notes

  • indexing in process

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2009 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Art of Narelle Oliver, Joy Lawn (interviewer), single work interview
In response to Lawn's questions regarding her artistic vision, innovative techniques and interest in natural Australian history, Oliver says her work is created through the 'intriguing relationship between words and pictures' and how 'they work either together or against each other as different points of view in a narrative' (4). Lawn asks Oliver about her 'vision and vocation' which, through her strong artistic style and celebratory designs of Australian indigenous animals, produces texts that are a 'melding of non-fiction and fiction' (5). Oliver says she has been fascinated by indigenous adaptations of Australian native animals since early childhood and this interest developed further when she studied biology. With her first picture book, Leaf Tail she wanted to introduce young readers to 'some of the less-well-known Australian creatures' but 'did not want to write a straight information book' (5). Instead, she wanted to explore the creative potential of the adaptive features to be found among many creatures - design, shape, texture and pattern - in terms of storytelling and 'problem-solution scenarios' (5). Oliver has also produced picture books about imaginary and mythological creatures, for example, Mermaids Most Amazing, The Very Blue Thingamajig, and Dancing the Boom-cha-cha Boogie, however, it is mainly through her natural history picture books that she aims to capture the diversity of Australia's natural landscapes and 'instil postive feelings about these places in young Australian readers' (6). In this sense, her work is driven by the belief that 'a personal feeling and knowledge of the landscape is critical to developing a desire to preserve that landscape' (6).
(p. 4-6)
Know the Author/Illustrator: An Enigma Wrapped in a Riddle, Tohby Riddle, James Roy , single work column
Tohby Riddle says his early career as a cartoonist at The Good Weekend was instrumental in developing his 'a habit for looking for ideas and generating them through different ways of thinking' (8). An 'art school graduate with an interest in architecture' city-scapes, buildings, and alleys form a common link in his work, a fascination Riddle says, 'began from the age of twelve or thirteen, when we moved closer to the city from a fairly bushy area north of Sydney Harbour' (9). Roy points out that Riddle's work conveys 'a certain lightness and joy' that makes his urban landscapes 'light and myterious' rather than'dark and unnerving' which Riddle arrtibutes to his love of cities eventually developing into an interest in 'the archetypal metropolis' (9-10). Riddle says, "I want my cities to appear as places where so many things are going on at once rather than some type of dystopian nightmare...reality is ambiguous and random and chaotic, and if you can just get a nice authentic slice of that into a book, then it bears repreated readings, repeated discussions about the possibilities of the meanings...' (10).
(p. 8-11) Section: Know the Author
Creating Early Readers for Indigenous Students, Sally Morgan , single work essay

Sally Morgan discusses the impetus behnd the Waarda Series which aims to 'create books that aupport the literary needs of Indigenous children in primary schools' as well as introducing non-Indigenous children to the richness and depth of Indigenous storytelling' (12). She explains that 'Waarda' is a Nyanger word for 'sharing news, stories and information' (12), however, the collection includes stories from the Palkyu, Mardi/Gija and Malgana as well as Nyanga people, whose country ranges form the Kimberley, Pilbara, Gascoigne and the south-east of the State. Their aim was to 'embrace the rich diversity of present day Aboriginal peoples' in order to recognize that 'Aboriginal people come from many different nations, with perspectives informed by their homelands and by collective, family and individual life experiences' (12). Morgan reveals that the project has developed through an 'ongoing, organic editorial process' that is 'flexible, open and able to evolve and grow as the project does' (13) and points to how the processes created by and through the project have a lot to offer in terms of 'the development of literacy skills seen as vital for the life opportunities of Indigenous children' (13). It is hoped that the series will not only add to the Aboriginal reading material already available and promote what can be achieved by Aboriginal people but will 'inspire children to have broader aspirations: to believe in the power of their own creative imaginations...' (13).

(p. 12-13)
Cover Book Review: Clancy and Millie and the Very Fine House, Nola Allen , single work review
— Review of Clancy and Millie and the Very Fine House Libby Gleeson , 2009 single work picture book ;
In her review of the latest collaborative effort from Libby Gleeson and Freya Blackwood, Clancy & Millie and the Very Fine House, Allen says the 'limited color palette' and 'spare text' creates a 'thoughtful composition' that heightens the emotional impact of the story. Clancy has moved from a 'cosy weatherboard cottage' to a mutili-level mansion in a canyon of concrete dwellings' and despite his parent's enthusiasim for their new home, "It's the best house...It's a very fine dwelling', he feels very lost and lonely (20). Allen points out, how Clancy's vulnerability is accentuated and exaggerated and it is the depiction of his emotions that 'provide the catylyst for the satisfying resolution' (20). With his new neighbour Millie, he constructs a towering cardboard house, to which Millie remarks, 'It's the best house. It's a very fine dwelling' (20). Allen concludes that the story will 'undoubtedly strike a chord with many young children who have shared this experience and for its genuine and honest depiction' (20).
(p. 20)
[Untitled], Margaret Robson Kett , single work review
— Review of Jakobi and Nan Esther Fischer , 2009 single work children's fiction picture book ;
(p. 26) Section: Before School
[Untitled], Sharon Greenaway , single work review
— Review of Sophie's Big Bed Tina Burke , 2007 single work picture book ;
(p. 26) Section: Before School
[Untitled], Liz Derouet , single work review
— Review of Dog and Bird Follow a Butterfly Tohby Riddle , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 26) Section: Before School
[Review] Manny and the Long Brave Day, Nola Allen , single work review
— Review of Mannie and the Long Brave Day Martine Murray , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 26-27) Section: Before School
[Untitled], Jo Goodman , single work review
— Review of I'm Number One Michael Rosen , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 27) Section: Before School
[Untitled], Moira Robinson , single work review
— Review of Grandpa Baby Margaret Wild , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 27) Section: Before School
[Review] Isabella's Garden, Russ Merrin , single work review
— Review of Isabella's Garden Glenda Millard , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 27) Section: Before School
[Untitled], Margaret Robson Kett , single work review
— Review of Chester and Gil Carol Faulkner , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 28) Section: Before School
[Untitled], Joan Zahnleiter , single work review
— Review of Fox and Fine Feathers Narelle Oliver , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 28) Section: Before School
[Untitled], Joan Zahnleiter , single work review
— Review of Wendy Gus Gordon , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 28-29) Section: Before School
[Untitled], Neville Barnard , single work review
— Review of One of Those Days John Heffernan , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 29) Section: Before School
[Untitled], Moira Robinson , single work review
— Review of The Toymaker and the Bird Pamela Allen , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 29) Section: Before School
[Review] Caterpillar and Butterfly, Moira Robinson , single work review
— Review of Caterpillar and Butterfly Ambelin Kwaymullina , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 30) Section: Beginner Readers
[Review] Captain Congo and the Maharaja's Monkey, Michael Janssen-Gibson , single work review
— Review of Captain Congo and the Maharaja's Monkey Ruth Starke , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 30) Section: Beginner Readers
[Untitled], Nola Allen , single work review
— Review of My Silent World Nette Hilton , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 30) Section: Beginner Reader
[Review] Mbobo Tree, Shauna Wilson , single work review
— Review of Mbobo Tree Glenda Millard , 2009 single work picture book ;
(p. 30-31) Section: Beginner Readers

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Last amended 16 Oct 2009 10:42:56
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