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Ernest Scott Prize
Subcategory of Awards Australian Awards
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History

'Emily Scott founded this prize to perpetuate the memory of her husband Emeritus Professor Sir Ernest Scott Knight Bachelor. Ernest Scott was professor of History at the University was for 23 years. The prize commemorates his interest in the development of Australian historical studies.

'Ernest Scott was professor of History from 1913 to 1936. Born outside wedlock, raised by his grandparents and enjoying no higher education, he worked as a journalist for twenty years. As a young Fabian and Theosophist, he married the daughter of Annie Besant and migrated to Melbourne in 1892. His books on Australian exploration history made Scott into a professional among amateurs and antiquarians. He inspired his students to do archival research and to ask critical questions of popular historical mythologies. A generation of young Australians learned about the country's past from his notable Short History of Australia (1916).' (Source : website)

Winners

2019 winner y separately published work icon Deep Time Dreaming : Uncovering Ancient Australia Billy Griffiths , Carlton : Black Inc. , 2018 12791018 2018 single work autobiography

'Soon after Billy Griffiths joins his first archaeological dig as camp manager and cook, he is hooked. Equipped with a historian’s inquiring mind, he embarks on a journey through time, seeking to understand the extraordinary deep history of the Australian continent.

'Deep Time Dreaming is the passionate product of that journey. It investigates a twin revolution: the reassertion of Aboriginal identity in the second half of the twentieth century, and the uncovering of the traces of ancient Australia.

'It explores what it means to live in a place of great antiquity, with its complex questions of ownership and belonging. It is about a slow shift in national consciousness: the deep time dreaming that has changed the way many of us relate to this continent and its enduring, dynamic human history.' (Publication summary)

2014 winner Angela Wanhalla for Matters of the Heart. A History of Interracial marriage in New Zealand,
2013 winner y separately published work icon Larrikins : A History Melissa Bellanta , St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2012 Z1852492 2012 single work criticism

'From the true-blue Crocodile Hunter to the blue humour of Stiffy and Mo, from the Beaconsfield miners to The Sentimental Bloke, Australia has often been said to possess a "larrikin streak". Today, being a larrikin has positive connotations and we think of it as the key to unlocking the Australian identity: a bloke who refuses to stand on ceremony and is a bit of scally wag. When it first emerged around 1870, however, larrikin was a term of abuse, used to describe teenage, working-class hell-raisers who populated dance halls and cheap theatres. Crucially, the early larrikins were female as well as male.

Larrikins : A History takes a trip through the street-based youth subculture known as larrikinism between 1870 and 1920. Swerving through the streets of Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney, it offers a glimpse into the lives of Australia's first larrikins, including bare knuckle-fighting, football-barracking, and knicker-flashing teenage girls. Along the way, it reveals much that is unexpected about the development of Australia's larrikin streak to present fascinating historical perspectives on hot "youth issues" today, including gang violence, racist riots, and raunch culture among adolescent girls.' Source: http://uqp.com.au (Sighted 03/04/2012).

Bellanta refers throughout to literary representations of the larrikin in the works by writers such as Louis Stone, Ambrose Pratt and C. J. Dennis.

2011 joint winner y separately published work icon A Three-Cornered Life : The Historian W. K. Hancock Jim Davidson , Sydney : University of New South Wales Press , 2010 Z1704878 2010 single work biography 'While W.K. Hancock may no longer be described as 'Australia's most distinguished historian', he has some enduring claims to our attention. No other Australian historian - and few elsewhere - can match his 'span', to use one of his watchwords. Hancock was a major historian in four or five fields, who himself made history by going on a mission to Uganda for the British government in 1954 to mediate the future of Buganda after its ruler had been exiled. He was also, from a room in the Cabinet Office in Whitehall, the editor of a vast historical project: the writing of a series of accounts of British mobilisation on the home front during the Second World War. In addition, Hancock was a founder of the Australian National University, while his Australia (1930) remains one of the classic accounts of this country' (Publishers website). Joint winner with Emma Christopher's A Merciless Place: The Lost Story of Britain's Convict Disaster in Africa and How It Led to the Settlement of Australia.
2010 winner Bain Attwood for Possession: Batman’s Treaty and the Matter of History
2009 winner y separately published work icon Drawing the Global Colour Line : White Men’s Countries and the Question of Racial Equality Henry Reynolds , Marilyn Lake , Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 2008 Z1509124 2008 single work non-fiction (taught in 1 units)

'[This] is a pioneering account of the transnational production of whiteness in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. A work remarkable both for its international breadth and for its sensitivity to local particularity, it is a model for the new global history.

Marilyn Lake and Henry Reynolds expertly and imaginatively reconstruct how leading white intellectuals and politicians in Australia, South Africa, the United States, and Great Britain fought demands for racial equality and jointly invented new doctrines of racial superiority to justify the maintenance and, in some cases, the reinvigoration of white privilege in every part of the world that Britain either controlled or in which it had once deposited its settlers.

A powerful and sobering history, incisively and elegantly told.' Gary Gerstle, author of American Crucible: Race and Nation in the Twentieth Century

2008 winner John Fitzgerald for Book Big White Lie: Chinese Australians in White Australia
2007 winner y separately published work icon Mixed Relations : Asian-Aboriginal Contact in North Australia Regina Ganter , The University of Western Australia : UWA Publishing , 2006 Z1590810 2006 single work multi chapter work oral history life story lyric/song

'Part conventional history and part oral history, Mixed Relations explores the successive phases of contact in Australia's north and explores the impact of a range of circumstances-political, legal and economic on - members of the polyethnic communities. Based on extensive research and hundreds of interviews, it provides fresh insights into the national narrative and poses challenging questions about identity in the twenty-first century' Publishers note (Sighted 20/05/2009)

2006 winner Joy Damousi for Freud in the Antipodes:  A Cultural History of Psychoanalysis in Australia
2005 winner y separately published work icon The Europeans in Australia : A History Alan Atkinson , Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1997 Z1178966 1997 reference non-fiction

'In the first volume of his history of Australia, Alan Atkinson covers the first impact of European power on Australia. He argues that the Europeans were not simply conquerors, that their own cultures were infinitely complex, thickly-woven with ideas about spirituality, authority, self and land, all of which influenced the development of Australia.' (Publication summary)

Democracy
2004 winner Judith Brett for Australian Liberals and the Moral Middle Class: from Alfred Deakin to John Howard
2002 winner Tony Hughes-d'Aeth for “Paper Nation:  The Story of the Picturesque Atlas of Australasia 1886‐1888”
2001 winner y separately published work icon Anxious Nation : Australia and the Rise of Asia, 1850-1939 (International) assertion David Robert Walker , University of Queensland Press , 1999 Z936672 1999 single work

'From the late nineteenth century the Asianisation of Australia has sparked anxious comment. The great catchcries of the day . . the awakening East. , . the yellow peril. , . populate or perish. . had a direct bearing on how Australians viewed their future. Anxious Nation provides a full and fascinating account of Australia's complex engagement with Asia.' (Publication summary)

1999 winner y separately published work icon Sacred Places : War Memorials in the Australian Landscape Ken Inglis , Carlton : Miegunyah Press , 1998 Z1065027 1998 single work non-fiction

'Memorials to Australian participation in wars abound in our landscape. From Melbourne's huge Shrine of Remembrance to the modest marble soldier, obelisk or memorial hall in suburb and country town, they mourn and honour Australians who have served and died for their country. Surprisingly, they have largely escaped scrutiny. Ken Inglis argues that the imagery, rituals and rhetoric generated around memorials constitute a civil religion, a cult of ANZAC. Sacred Places traces three elements which converged to create the cult: the special place of war in the European mind when nationalism was at its zenith; the colonial condition; and the death of so many young men in distant battle, which impelled the bereaved to make substitutes for the graves of which history had deprived them. The 'war memorial movement' attracted conflict as well as commitment. Inglis looks at uneasy acceptance, even rejection, of the cult by socialists, pacifists, feminists and some Christians, and at its virtual exclusion of Aborigines. He suggests that between 1918 and 1939 the making, dedication and use of memorials enhanced the power of the right in Australian public life. Finally, he examines a paradox. Why, as Australia's wars recede in public and private memory, and as a once British Australia becomes multicultural, have the memorials and what they stand for become more cherished than ever? Sacred Places spans war, religion, politics, language and the visual arts. Ken Inglis has distilled new cultural understandings from a familiar landscape.' (Publication summary)

1998 winner Anne Salmond for Between Worlds.  Early Exchanges between Maoris and Europeans, 1773‐1815
1996-1997 winner y separately published work icon Hunters and Collectors : The Antiquarian Imagination in Australia Tom Griffiths , Melbourne Cambridge New York (City) : Cambridge University Press , 1996 Z1179361 1996 single work non-fiction

'Hunters and Collectors is about historical consciousness and environmental sensibilities in European Australia from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. It is in part a collective biography of the amateur scientists and humanists who have shaped the Australian historical imagination. Griffiths illuminates the way these avid collectors and discussants of the Australian land and its indigenous inhabitants have contributed a sense of national identity. He also shows how their activities feed into the political and environmental debates of the 1990s.' (Publication summary)

1996-1997
1994-1995 winner David Goodman for Gold Seeking Victoria and California in the 1850's
1992-1993 winner y separately published work icon Robert Menzies' Forgotten People Judith Brett , Chippendale : Pan Macmillan Australia , 1992 Z1414032 1992 single work biography

'In 1941, RG Menzies delivered to war-time Australia what was to be his richest, most creative speech, and one of his most influential. 'The Forgotten People' was a direct address to the Australian middle class, the "people" who would return him to power in 1949 and keep him there until his retirement in 1966.

'Who were these "forgotten people"? The middle class pitting their values of hard work and independence against the collectivist ethos of labour? Women, shunning the class-based politics of men? The parents of Menzies' childhood in the small country town of Jeparit? Australians struggling to maintain a derivative culture at the edges of the British Empire? Or all of them, in a richly over-determined image that takes us to the heart of Menzies' mid-life political transformation?

'Judith Brett deftly traces the links between the private and public meanings of Menzies' political language to produce compelling insights into the man and the culture he represented.' (Publisher's blurb)

1990-1991 winner Anne Salmond for Two Worlds: First Meetings Between Maori and European 1642‐1772
1988-1989 winner Alan Atkinson for Camden: Farm and Village Life in Early New South Wales
1986-1987 winner Patrick J. O'Farrell for The Irish in Australia
1984-1985 winner Janet McCalman for Struggletown: Public and Private Life in Richmond 1900‐1965
1982-1983 winner y separately published work icon This Is the ABC : The Australian Broadcasting Commission, 1932-1983 Ken Inglis , Melbourne : Melbourne University Press , 1983 Z1304993 1983 single work criticism

'As the bells in the tower of Sydney's General Post Office chimed eight o'clock on the evening of Friday 1 July 1932, the peals were picked up by a microphone and carried to every State of the Federation. 'This is the Australian Broadcasting Commission,' said the announcer, Conrad Charlton.

'So begins K.S. Inglis's compelling history of the first fifty years of the ABC. In a sparkling tour de force Inglis shows us the ABC's triumphs and failures, its great medley of personalities and the effects it has had on Australian public life. Based on the Commission's own archives, on newspapers and journals, on a rich assortment of interviews and on the author's own listening and viewing, this is a social history of the highest order.' (Publication summary)

1980-1981 winner y separately published work icon The Other Side of the Frontier : Aboriginal Resistance to the European Invasion of Australia Henry Reynolds , Townsville : Department of History and Politics, James Cook University , 1981 6169119 1981 single work non-fiction

'The publication of this book in 1981 profoundly changed the way in which we understand the history of relations between indigenous Australians and European settlers. It has since become a classic of Australian history. Drawing from documentary and oral evidence, the book describes in meticulous and compelling detail the ways in which Aborigines responded to the arrival of Europeans. Henry Reynolds’ argument that the Aborigines resisted fiercely was highly original when it was first published and is no less challenging today.' (Source: Google Books website)

1978-1979 winner y separately published work icon The Rise and Fall of Marvellous Melbourne Graeme Davison , Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 1978 Z1181054 1978 single work non-fiction (taught in 1 units)

'With a new preface and epilogue and a collection of picture essays by contemporary writers, this updated edition explores the economic, political, social, and cultural consequences of the economic rise and fall of Melbourne during the 1880s.' (Publication summary, 2005 edition)

1978-1979 winner Weston Bate for Lucky City: The First Generation at Ballarat 1851‐1951 Melbourne
1976-1977 winner John Rickard for Class and Politics: New South Wales, Victoria and the Early Commonwealth, 1890‐1910
1974-1975 winner y separately published work icon "A Bit of a Rebel" : The Life and Work of George Arnold Wood R. M. Crawford , Sydney : Sydney University Press , 1975 Z812414 1975 single work

'Wood had once called himself ‘a bit of a rebel’, but equally saw himself as serving an old and honourable tradition. This was true to his Puritan ancestry and to his Manchester upbringing. It was equally true to Jowett’s Balliol where his mind blossomed, and to Fairbairn’s Mansfield College where doubts honestly faced steeled his will. When he sailed for Sydney University, he said goodbye to the eminent reputation among English historians that would almost certainly have been his. Instead he gained the affectionate and enduring respect of generations of Australian students. This immensely interesting biography deals with Wood as a teacher and writer of History, but also with the jovial ‘Woody’ of student skit and verse which might gently tease but never savaged him. It is at once a study of the University Professor and of the man seen in the context of that family life in which he took huge delight.' (Publication summary)

1972-1973 winner John Andrew La Nauze for The Making of the Australian Constitution
1970-1971 winner Geoffrey Serle for The rush to be rich : a history of the colony of Victoria, 1883‐1889
1970-1971 winner Paul Hasluck for The Government and the People 1942‐45 Australian War Memorial
1968-1969 winner y separately published work icon A History of Australia Manning Clark , Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 1962-1987 Z1039986 1962-1987 single work non-fiction

'In 1962, the first volume of Manning Clark's "A History of Australia" appeared. For the next two-and-a-half decades Clark unfolded his tragic celebration of white Australian history. Today, the six-volume history is one of the masterpieces of Australian literature. It is also one of the most passionately debated visions of Australian history. Clark's Australians are men and women of lively goodwill and deep sinfulness, of generous idealism and unthinking brutality. He dramatizes the motivating forces of Australian life - cowardice and vision, cruelty and defiance, greatness of spirit and the spiritual vacuity of the suburbs - all of them locked in the unceasing struggle which builds a nation. Michael Cathcart has re-orchestrated Clark's epic narrative in this single volume. Every page of this abridgement rings with Manning Clark's voice. Here, at last, the general reader can encounter the deep resonances, pessimism and passion of Manning Clark - Australian historian and prophet. Michael Cathcart is co-author of "Mission to the South Seas: the Voyage of the Duff" and author of "Defending the National Tuckshop", a study of conservative responses to the Great Depression.' (Publication summary)

for Volume 2
1966-1967 winner y separately published work icon Australian Dictionary of Biography D. H. Pike (editor), Bede Nairn (editor), Geoffrey Serle (editor), John D. Ritchie (editor), Diane Langmore (editor), Melbourne London New York (City) : Melbourne University Press Cambridge University Press , 1966- Z1461268 1966- reference biography

'The Australian Dictionary of Biography is a national, co-operative enterprise, founded and maintained by the Australian National University (ANU), as a project that fulfils one of the original purposes of the university.'

Source: Australian Dictionary of Biography website, http://www.adb.online.anu.edu.au/
Sighted: 21/01/2007

for  Vols. 1 & 2
1964-1965 winner y separately published work icon Alfred Deakin : A Biography John Andrew La Nauze , Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 1965 Z1554962 1965 single work biography

Alfred Deakin (1856-1919) was known to the public during his lifetime as statesman, orator, one of the ‘fathers’ of Federation, and three time Prime minister of the Commonwealth of Australia…Professor La Nauze insists that his work is primarily biographical; but it is necessarily also an important contribution to Australian and imperial history in general. ' (Publication summary)

1962-1963 joint winner y separately published work icon A History of Australia Manning Clark , Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 1962-1987 Z1039986 1962-1987 single work non-fiction

'In 1962, the first volume of Manning Clark's "A History of Australia" appeared. For the next two-and-a-half decades Clark unfolded his tragic celebration of white Australian history. Today, the six-volume history is one of the masterpieces of Australian literature. It is also one of the most passionately debated visions of Australian history. Clark's Australians are men and women of lively goodwill and deep sinfulness, of generous idealism and unthinking brutality. He dramatizes the motivating forces of Australian life - cowardice and vision, cruelty and defiance, greatness of spirit and the spiritual vacuity of the suburbs - all of them locked in the unceasing struggle which builds a nation. Michael Cathcart has re-orchestrated Clark's epic narrative in this single volume. Every page of this abridgement rings with Manning Clark's voice. Here, at last, the general reader can encounter the deep resonances, pessimism and passion of Manning Clark - Australian historian and prophet. Michael Cathcart is co-author of "Mission to the South Seas: the Voyage of the Duff" and author of "Defending the National Tuckshop", a study of conservative responses to the Great Depression.' (Publication summary)

Volume 1 - with Dr A Geoffrey Serle,The Golden Age: A History of the Colony of  Victoria 1851‐61
1960-1961 joint winner y separately published work icon European Vision and the South Pacific 1768-1850 : A Study in the History of Art and Ideas European Vision and the South Pacific Bernard Smith , Oxford : Clarendon Press , 1960 Z1451697 1960 single work prose
1960-1961 winner J. C. Beaglehole
1958-1959 joint winner y separately published work icon The Australian Legend Russel Ward , Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1958 Z12060 1958 multi chapter work criticism

'In this classic piece of Australian literary heritage, Russell Ward looks at the ideals, traits and behaviours Australians think as typical of themselves. His now famous, penetrating analysis of nineteenth century Australian history shows how the characteristically Australian traits first found expression in the frontier life of the nomad pastoral workers of the outback, eventually pervading Australian literature and life in general. Ward has drawn on both English and American literature, documents and statistics, journals and papers and perhaps most vividly of all, on Australian folk-songs and ballads for his account. First published in 1958, this important literary work is now available in a striking new jacket for a further generation of Australian readers.' (Publication summary)

Shared with Dr Keith Sinclair author of A History of New Zealand
1955 winner y separately published work icon The Peaks of Lyell Geoffrey Blainey , Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 1954 Z1259320 1954 single work prose travel

'The Peaks of Lyell is a book by Geoffrey Blainey, based on his University of Melbourne MA thesis originally published in 1954.[1] It contains the history of the Mount Lyell Mining and Railway Company, and through association, Queenstown and further the West Coast Tasmania...' (Source : Wikipedia)

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