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y separately published work icon Griffith Review periodical issue  
Alternative title: Crimes and Punishments
Issue Details: First known date: 2019... no. 65 August 2019 of Griffith Review est. 2003- Griffith Review
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'What is it about crime stories that make people hunger for them? The volume of content produced in these genres – from the pages of mysteries and thrillers to audio and visual dramas and reconstructions – hints at a primal and deeply ingrained fascination with the darker side of human nature. While crime fiction has long held appeal for the reading public, the ways that crimes play out in the real world are often more complex, compelling and shocking than the most complicated imagined plots.

'Griffith Review 65: Crimes and Punishments tells stories of reform and possibility from inside our institutions, from the greatest to the smallest of their participants. It tells stories of state-sanctioned violence, of justice after decades of systematic failures and betrayals, of truths, lies and assumptions, and of the ones that get away.' (Issue summary)

Notes

  •  Only literary material within AustLit's scope individually indexed. Other material in this issue includes:

    Unmasking a culture of corruption — Gary Crooke

    Enduring change — Paul D. Williams

    Looking at the big picture —  Desmond Manderson

    As if children mattered… — Ross Homel

    Bringing in the bystander — Shaan Ross-Smith & Anoushka Dowling & Paul Mazerolle

    Lost for words — Danielle Arlanda Harris

    Keeping it together — Susan Dennison

    Mountain ashed — Karen Viggers

    Courting injustice — Julian Murphy

    'This is how I will strangle you' — Gideon Haigh

    From little things — Kristina Olsson

    Pirate mailbox  by RJ Keeler

  • Page numbers needed when sighted.

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2019 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Retribution, Reform, Rehabilitation : The Fraught Pursuit of Justice, Ashley Hay , single work essay

'The perimeter of  the New Gaol on Norfolk Island features imposing walls set with three archways, one high and two low. The setting sun throws long shadows onto vivid green grass and the light bleaches the view through the arches to a gentle haze. This is all that remains of the pentagonal panopticon built during the third phase of convict transportation (1825–1855) to this island situated some 1,500 kilometres off the east coast of Australia. And though the prison’s buildings are long gone, these arches were once a gateway into the architecture of Great Britain’s global penal system – the ‘ne plus ultra…of convict degradation’, as Robert Hughes put it in The Fatal Shore (Knopf, 1986). What is now an elegant, slightly surreal parkland – a landscape that is picture-book perfect – is also preternaturally silent: a remnant of the comprehensive system of colonial justice and punishment that first brought the authority and might of the British Empire to this part of the world.' (Introduction)

Revisiting the Dark Man : A Journey into Queensland’s Shadow, Matthew Condon , single work autobiography

'One recent Saturday morning, I once again drove my children to the street in Brisbane’s west where I grew up as a boy.

'They had been on this journey too many times to remember: the pleasant drive through The Gap in the Taylor Range, past the old jam factory and the golf course, left into Payne Road and then sharp left into the dogleg that is Bernarra Street.' (Introduction)

On the Record : The Trials of Court Transcription, Catherine Ford , single work autobiography

'A year ago, feeling hopeless about my work as a freelance writer, I began to look for other ways to bring in money – something steadier to tide me over, with possibly even fair pay. One night, I saw a fiftysomething scientist talking on TV about her job dissatisfaction, how she’d left her position, moved to a coastal town with ocean views, and was loving the freedoms of being a remote court transcriber. I thought: maybe I could do that, and while I didn’t move to a beach, I did go onto the website of Australia’s biggest court transcription company to investigate what such work involved.' (Introduction)

The How Matters : Language, Loss and Unanswered Questions, Hayley Katzen , single work essay

'On Saturday 15 March 2014, my stepmother Genee was shot twice in her bed in Johannesburg. No. That’s misleading: ‘was shot’ suggests she might still be alive. Genee died on 15 March 2014.

'No. That’s misleading too. Without the other detail, ‘died’ suggests she was old and had a heart attack or stroke. Natural causes, if such things still exist.'  (Introduction)

The Trauma of Discipline : What Constitutes a Reasonable Chastisement?, Yen-Rong Wong , single work autobiography
Paradise Lost " The Cedar Bay Raid, Bill Wilkie , single work essay

'It's May, the end of the wet season in Far North Queensland, and storm clouds brew ominously to the north. We’ve already driven for three hours from Mossman, including an hour along the four-wheel-drive-only Bloomfield Track, to Home Rule, south of Cooktown, where we are about to embark on a three-day walk to an isolated tropical beach: Cedar Bay.

'My companion Greg is a National Parks ranger and is here to assess the track for the upcoming dry season. My motives for the walk are different: I’m seeking out a story. Cedar Bay has a reputation, and I want to see the place for myself. In August 1976, during the era of Joh Bjelke-Petersen, the Queensland Police Force launched a raid on the isolated hippie community living there. The bungled raid has become part of the local folklore.' (Introduction)

White Justice, Black Suffering : Extracting False Confessions, Amy McQuire , single work essay autobiography

'For the entirety of my childhood – all through the ’90s, the early noughts – I watched my father go through the same routine. Most days, he rose before the sun, putting on the kettle and sipping coffee as he watched the darkness fade into light. His uniform would be ironed and laid out from the night before, each crease perfectly pressed, just as he learned in the army. He would brush his teeth, comb his bushy hair and kiss us – his children – goodbye, before pushing out the door to make the twenty-minute drive to the Etna Creek jail, just outside Rockhampton.'  (Introduction)

Gun, Beejay Silcox , single work short story
The Sin Room, Lucy Sussex , single work short story
Memorial Park, Sally Piper , single work short story
Visiting Day, Mandy Sayer , single work short story
Prepping, Patrick Allington , single work short story
Adjudgedi"Justin R Haymaker, financial adviser,", Philip Dean , single work poetry
Pablo Escobar’s Hippopotamusi"He had four hippos in his private zoo", Philip Neilsen , single work poetry
Five Years Is Too Long : When Your Brother's in a Chinese Detention Centre, Luisa Redford , single work essay

'In April 2015, the Australian media is awash with stories of Australians in international prisons for drug trafficking. The death penalty is a hot topic of conversation. Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran will be executed in Indonesia in a matter of days. When your brother is among the stories being reported, you trawl the articles for information, clues into what is going on. You look for common details in the cases and compare legal jurisdictions. You search for something that might tell you why they did it – and why he did it, too. Tony was detained in March 2014 and formally charged in October; the verdict was handed down in April 2015. It made headlines: ‘Life or death for SA jockey in China.’ (Introduction)

Manus Prison Theory : Borders, Incarceration and Collective Agency, Omid Tofighian , Behrouz Boochani , single work interview
'Shortly after the release of No Friend but the Mountains: Writing From Manus Prison (Picador, 2018), both Behrouz Boochani and Omid Tofighian, author and translator, engaged in a public discussion (18 November 2018) at the Coventry Library in Stirling, Adelaide Hills, organised by the Adelaide Vigil for Manus and Nauru. Behrouz was speaking via Skype from Manus, and Omid was in Australia while on leave from teaching at the American University in Cairo. This article is an edited version of that conversation – the first time the two explored the central issues raised by the book and the accompanying translator’s essays.' (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Retribution, Reform, Rehabilitation : The Fraught Pursuit of Justice Ashley Hay , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Griffith Review , August no. 65 2019;

'The perimeter of  the New Gaol on Norfolk Island features imposing walls set with three archways, one high and two low. The setting sun throws long shadows onto vivid green grass and the light bleaches the view through the arches to a gentle haze. This is all that remains of the pentagonal panopticon built during the third phase of convict transportation (1825–1855) to this island situated some 1,500 kilometres off the east coast of Australia. And though the prison’s buildings are long gone, these arches were once a gateway into the architecture of Great Britain’s global penal system – the ‘ne plus ultra…of convict degradation’, as Robert Hughes put it in The Fatal Shore (Knopf, 1986). What is now an elegant, slightly surreal parkland – a landscape that is picture-book perfect – is also preternaturally silent: a remnant of the comprehensive system of colonial justice and punishment that first brought the authority and might of the British Empire to this part of the world.' (Introduction)

Retribution, Reform, Rehabilitation : The Fraught Pursuit of Justice Ashley Hay , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Griffith Review , August no. 65 2019;

'The perimeter of  the New Gaol on Norfolk Island features imposing walls set with three archways, one high and two low. The setting sun throws long shadows onto vivid green grass and the light bleaches the view through the arches to a gentle haze. This is all that remains of the pentagonal panopticon built during the third phase of convict transportation (1825–1855) to this island situated some 1,500 kilometres off the east coast of Australia. And though the prison’s buildings are long gone, these arches were once a gateway into the architecture of Great Britain’s global penal system – the ‘ne plus ultra…of convict degradation’, as Robert Hughes put it in The Fatal Shore (Knopf, 1986). What is now an elegant, slightly surreal parkland – a landscape that is picture-book perfect – is also preternaturally silent: a remnant of the comprehensive system of colonial justice and punishment that first brought the authority and might of the British Empire to this part of the world.' (Introduction)

Last amended 7 Aug 2019 13:10:50
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