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Craig Batty Craig Batty i(6849260 works by)
Gender: Male
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Works By

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1 Collaborating Upwards : Writing across Hierarchical Boundaries Elizabeth Ellison , Craig Batty , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 59 2020;
'As a practice, collaborative writing between students and supervisors is hardly new and can be considered common in STEM disciplines. This has not always been the case in the creative arts, where there are different expectations around authorship and, as in other contexts, potentially deeper considerations of power and authority. In this article, we examine modes of collaborative writing practice in the creative arts, with a particular focus on writing across hierarchical boundaries in research training scenarios. Using screenwriting practice as a context for this discussion, and informed by our own reflective practice, we identify a number of collaborative writing ‘modes’ (which we have named ‘take the lead’, ‘share the load’, and ‘learn the ropes’) and offer possible strategies for those writing across hierarchical relationships and boundaries. This is important for understanding what might otherwise become an assumed, misunderstood or, worse, predatory practice that disempowers students and unfairly advantages supervisors. As part of our exploration, we draw on our experiences of running cohort-based, collaborative research opportunities in creative disciplines. Reflecting on our experiences in regard to our own collaborations allows us to examine how these structures have enabled students to find their own agency within these collaborative spaces.' (Publication abstract)
1 Writing the Organisational Crisis : Embodied Leadership Engaged through the Lens of a Playscript Christopher Michael Conroy , Craig Batty , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Writing , vol. 17 no. 4 2020; (p. 414-427)

'In a sea of endless stories of corporate ethical scandals, many of which are attributed to ‘failed leadership', this article examines how creative writing research is being used as a way of inspiring – or suggesting – new forms of leadership behaviour. In the processual nature of being in our lives, if experience is valued as primary to consciousness as a way of active belonging, then it will be argued that creative writing – here, scriptwriting specifically – is a powerful medium to examine organisational experiences. This research practice occurs through the lens of affect in embodied responses to such experience, as distinct from the singular, scientific mode of cognitive analysis that can cause us to habitually jump too quickly to conclusions about our experiences. By employing the affective methodology of creative practice research, which in this case forms the basis for a PhD currently in candidature, this article speculates how creative writing might disrupt habitual thinking through the elevation of emergent data from our physical senses. Creative writing can, we argue, provide a balance for science to work with art and craft, and in doing so encourage new thinking in the fields of organisational behaviour, relational leadership and creative practice research.' (Publication abstract)

1 Inside the Story : The Trauma Cleaner - a Beautiful Meditation on Death and Decay Craig Batty , 2020 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 22 January 2020;

'Sarah Krasnostein’s The Trauma Cleaner has won many awards since it was published in 2017, including the Victorian Prize for Literature and the Australian Book Industry Award General Non-Fiction Book of the Year.'  (Introduction)

1 Investigating Candidates’ Research Experience beyond the Thesis : the Peripheral World of the Doctorate Donna Lee Brien , Alison Owens , Craig Batty , Elizabeth Ellison , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 57 2019;
'This article focuses on both the process and the results of a recently completed research project that concentrated on what are commonly seen as peripheral aspects of the doctorate; that is, aspects of candidature that lie beyond, and outside of, the core work of what is widely understood to be research training. The project saw 18 candidates from the creative arts and humanities – and creative writing in particular – gather to reflect upon their learning journeys, and then analyse and theorise the ‘human’ dimensions of undertaking a doctorate. These often peripheral aspects were revealed to have a major influence on undertaking a research degree, as well as affecting candidates’ progress and satisfaction with their studies, and career potential beyond the research degree. This article first outlines how candidates were able to develop a language with which to identify some of the major human dimensions – the lived experience – of undertaking a doctorate that emerged from the project. It then explores how candidates were able to articulate their own growth in the form of producing an edited collection of essays in order that others might benefit from this reflective learning.'

 (Publication abstract)

1 Comedy Writing as Method : Reflections on Screenwriting in Creative Practice Research Craig Batty , Stayci Taylor , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Writing , vol. 16 no. 3 2019; (p. 374-392)

'Comedy writers use their practice to raise questions and create awareness about social, political and cultural issues, but can these practitioners be considered academics? With creative modalities of enquiry now commonplace in universities – where research is used to shape one’s practice, resulting in creative work that embodies that research – when does comedy writing start to take on a different function? In this article, we discuss comedy screenwriting in an academic setting, arguing that it has potential as a rigorous mode of research that can sit happily alongside art, design, creative writing and media practice. Much has been written about creative practice research, yet not so much has been written about the form this type of research takes; specifically, why one might choose comedy to express, embody or otherwise perform the findings of research. Here, then, we draw on our experiences of undertaking screenwriting projects using comedy to discuss the ways in which researchers might use the comic mode to present their findings in imaginative, innovative and fun ways that can expand understanding and, potentially, garner impact.' (Publication abstract)

1 Writing the Powerful Female World of Wentworth Craig Batty , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 11 July 2019;

'One of the major considerations when creating an ongoing television series is its “story world”, made up by its place, people, themes, style and tone. Central to this world is the setting, known in television writing as the “hub” or “precinct”, which serves the need for constant generation of characters and storylines.' (Introduction)

1 The Merger - a Sports Film as a Vehicle for Social Change Craig Batty , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 7 May 2019;

'Why do we tell stories, and how are they crafted? In a new series, we unpick the work of the writer on both page and screen.'

1 The Comedy Web Series : Reshaping Australian Script Development and Commissioning Practices Marilyn Tofler , Craig Batty , Stayci Taylor , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , vol. 8 no. 1 2019; (p. 71-84)

This article argues that, for Australian comedy series creators, the web platform has opened a new space in which the 'rules' of script development are being expanded, enhanced or othenoise refashioned through having direct connection  with and input from their audience. With the audience's potential as a 'comedy gatekeeper, the web series audience becomes integral to the ways in which these texts are developed, namely skipping the erstwhile second-guessing of demographic tastes by more traditional broadcast development executives and commissioners. Referring to a range of well-known Australian comedy web series, such as Bondi Hipsters (2011-2017) and The Katering Show (2015-2017) — including what their creators, writers and audiences have said about them — we investigate the processes behind the success of these series...'  (Publication abstract)

1 y separately published work icon TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses vol. 22 no. 1 April Dallas J. Baker (editor), Craig Batty (editor), 2018 13995593 2018 periodical issue

'Scholarly contributions to this issue of TEXT include a broad range of topics from reflective practice, improvisation, and collaborative writing as method, to questions of examination, experimentation, misinterpretation and activism.' (Source : Editorial)

1 A Vacuous Screenplay in Search of Rigour Craig Batty , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , April no. 48 2018;

'A university professor with a reputation for creative practice research finds himself at a crossroads when, en route to an international conference, he meets a younger and somewhat modest dementia researcher whose work is clearly having an impact on people’s lives. A keynote at a creative writing conference in Hawaii, the professor is impelled to reflect on his own research practice and piece together fragments of his work history to reassure himself that what he does is not only valid as research, but also that it has rigour. With flashbacks to a variety of painful and often comic encounters with colleagues trying to articulate their practice as research, he is able to overcome his midflight, mid-career crisis and come to a renewed and satisfactory understanding of what good creative practice research is, and how that can be articulated clearly and confidently to others. Originally performed at the University of Southern Queensland’s inaugural ‘Scriptwriting as Research’ symposium in 2016, A Vacuous Screenplay in Search of Rigour thus interrogates not only the very mode of creative practice research, but also the broader (and varied) institutional research cultures within which it operates.

1 The Role of Fiction in Screenwriting (as) Research Craig Batty , Dallas J. Baker , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , April no. 48 2018;

'In the ‘Screenplays as Research Artefacts’ special issue of TEXT (Baker & Batty 2018), which is the fourth in a line of those focussed on scriptwriting as research, but the first to focus exclusively on writing for the screen, we present a range of stories, worlds, characters, visual scenarios and dialogue exchanges that function as vessels for theories and ideas. The eleven screenplays included in this issue use creative practice approaches to research across a wide variety of discourses, from archival work on historical subjects, to notions of gender, sex and sexuality, to more meta concepts regarding screenwriting craft and researching in the academy. But all of these screenplays have one important aspect in common: the use of fiction to do this research work. Whether parody, speculative biography or straight-forward drama, all of the works in this special issue embrace fiction as an important method to convey their respective critical concerns. Perhaps this is one of the hallmarks of screenwriting (as) research when compared with associated forms in creative writing and screen production: fiction as a staple of its storytelling. There are, of course, those who use non-fiction in screenwriting (as) research; but comparatively, and considering the affectual nature of screen drama and comedy, is fiction one of the defining features of this creative practice research endeavour? Let us consider this idea before we outline the works that appear in the issue.'  (Introduction)

1 y separately published work icon TEXT Special Issue Website Series Screenplays as Research Artefacts no. 48 April Dallas J. Baker (editor), Craig Batty (editor), 2018 13995105 2018 periodical issue

'Here the authors discuss the role of fiction in screenwriting practice research. The screenplays included in the ‘Screenplays as Research Artefacts’ special issue of TEXT present a range of stories, worlds, characters, visual scenarios and dialogue exchanges that function as vessels for theories and ideas. These eleven screenplays all use creative practice approaches to research across a wide variety of discourses. All of the works embrace fiction as an important method to convey their respective critical concerns, which, the authors argue, evidences an emerging hallmark of screenwriting (as) research when compared with associated forms in the creative writing and screen production disciplines: fiction as a staple of its storytelling, creative practice and research methodology. The authors suggest that the use of fiction to perform research and present findings illuminates the ways that knowledge can be affective, not merely textual or verbal, something that is exemplified in the selected screenplays.' ( Craig Batty and Dallas John Baker : introduction) 

1 Contributing to Knowledge in Creative Writing Research : What, Where, How? Craig Batty , Allyson Holbrook , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , no. 44 2017;

'There is general agreement that doctoral research should show ‘originality’, but there is less agreement about what that means or how it is distinguished from ‘contribution’. There is also a strand in the literature that attests that different disciplines, especially relative newcomers to the doctorate such as the creative arts, privilege different qualities of originality and forms of contribution. This prompts the question: what constitutes an original contribution in the field of creative writing? Drawing on the growing literature on creative doctorates, reference to a number of examiner reports collected for a larger project, and reflections on supervising and examining creative writing PhDs, this paper explores the various forms of contribution that characterise the discourse on knowledge creation and dissemination in creative writing research.'  (Publication abstract)

1 The Screenwriting PhD : Creative Practice, Critical Theory and Contributing to Knowledge Craig Batty , Kathryn Beaton , Stephen Sculley , Stayci Taylor , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , no. 44 2017;

'This article explores ‘the exegesis now’ from the perspective of the screenwriting practice PhD. Using as a playful homage to traditional screenplay structure, the archetypal Hero’s Journey, it maps the landscape and offers examples of how the screenwriting exegesis/dissertation is occurring at RMIT University. This includes a comedy feature film about gender and perspective; a multiple-protagonist feature film set in the world of avid Doctor Who fans; and a hybrid form, the screen novel, set in the politically corrupt world of contemporary Melbourne transport infrastructure. Guided by their supervisor ‘mentor’, two candidates and one recent graduate embark on a collaborative journey that probes, prods, prises open and proposes what the screenwriting practice PhD can do and look like, and by doing so raise important points about the purpose and form of the dissertation. Collectively, the authors assume the simultaneous roles of the candidate who is doing, completing and has completed; the experienced supervisor; and the in-training supervisor.' (Publication abstract)

1 The Exegesis Now : Where Are We, and Where Are We Going? Craig Batty , Donna Lee Brien , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , no. 44 2017;

'This Special Issue asks: what does the creative writing PhD exegesis look like today? Related questions include whether it is still – and, indeed, if it ever was – called an exegesis across all, or most, institutions; and does it still primarily exist as a separate, written document that accompanies the creative work? Representing a series of key institutions and creative writing academics across Australia, this Special Issue of TEXT draws together supervisors and candidates to reflect upon and provide rich, experience-based accounts of what the exegesis looks like and how it functions today. One of the aims of this is to start to think about the future of the form; indeed, where the exegesis might go next.' (Introduction)

1 1 y separately published work icon TEXT Special Issue Website Series The Exegesis Now no. 44 Craig Batty (editor), Donna Lee Brien (editor), 2017 12940756 2017 periodical issue

'This Special Issue asks: what does the creative writing PhD exegesis look like today? Related questions include whether it is still – and, indeed, if it ever was – called an exegesis across all, or most, institutions; and does it still primarily exist as a separate, written document that accompanies the creative work? Representing a series of key institutions and creative writing academics across Australia, this Special Issue of TEXT draws together supervisors and candidates to reflect upon and provide rich, experiencebased accounts of what the exegesis looks like and how it functions today. One of the aims of this is to start to think about the future of the form; indeed, where the exegesis might go next.'  (Craig Batty and Donna Lee Brien : Introduction)

1 Methodologically Speaking: Innovative Approaches to Knowledge and Text in Creative Writing Research Mattie Sempert , Louise Sawtell , Peta Murray , Sophie Langley , Craig Batty , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Writing , May vol. 14 no. 2 2017; (p. 205-222)
'This article considers how creative writers use research to experiment with and expand the written form. Focussing on modes of storytelling for fiction and non-fiction, four current research degree candidates and a supervisor-mentor from RMIT University present snapshots of research works in progress, to reveal how they are negotiating the sticky yet rich relationship between theory and practice. Specifically, they offer innovative ways of expanding the written form to combine creative and critical modes of thought, resulting in distinctive contributions to knowledge and practice that are relevant to their genres, forms and subject matters. The candidates, who are working across the lyric essay, screenwriting, performance writing and radio, are also members of a peer-to-peer group facilitated by the supervisor-mentor, which over a four-year period has supported research training in creative writing and assisted in the formation of new research identities. This collaborative support structure has helped candidates to transform from creative writers to creative writing researchers, encouraging playfulness and experimentation yet underpinned by the needs of academic rigour. This article thus offers a collective, reflective approach to finding innovation in/through creative writing research – methodologically speaking.' (Publication abstract)
1 The (Im)perfect Screenplay : A Parody of Craft and Industry Craig Batty , 2015 single work drama
— Appears in: TEXT : Special Issue Website Series , October no. 30 2015;
'Drawing on the author’s twelve years of teaching, researching and writing about screenwriting craft, this work draws attention to formulaic conventions and the industry in which they operate in the form of a parody of an episode of a hypothetical low-budget Australian soap opera. It is structured as a soap opera typically would be, with an episode containing parallel and tonally different storylines set in the context of a day, but deliberately exploits craft and convention to the extreme. In the vein of Victoria Wood’s Acorn Antiques, a television sitcom that parodied 1980s British soap operas, The (Im)Perfect Screenplay: A Parody of Craft and Industry seeks more critically to reveal the hidden (to many) craft techniques of screenwriting by creating an explicit awareness of how they operate within a well-known genre and format. By doing so, the work offers simultaneously a perfect and an imperfect screenplay. It contributes to the field of screenwriting in the academy through the performative potential of the screenplay as a research artefact.' (Publication abstract)
1 A Screenwriter's Journey into Theme, and How Creative Writing Research Might Help Us to Define Screen Production Research Craig Batty , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 9 no. 2 2015; (p. 110-121)
'Although critical works relevant to screen production research exist, they are often fragmented (screen production placed alongside general media production) and, I want to suggest, not brave enough to embrace the term screen production research. With ‘dirty’ connotations to an industry some see far removed from the academy, screen production research has not yet been able to justify its existence, unlike, for example, the discipline of creative writing, which has achieved a lot in regard to its research agenda and footprint. This article thus proposes definitions and examples from which we might build the foundations for a better understanding of screen production research and its future potential in the academy. This will be achieved by offering a critical and reflective discussion of how theme can be used as a creative and collaborative tool for use in the development of a screenplay. By doing this, the article seeks not to theorise practice per se, but rather to intellectualise it for the benefit of practitioner-academics with interests in screen production research specifically, and creative practice research more broadly. As an important aspect of screen production, screenwriting is a useful lens through which to consider this type of research, partly because of how it is often positioned between creative writing and screen production. For example, the practice of screenwriting might be understood as creative writing, and the development of a screenplay might be understood as screen production. Similarly, the processes undertaken by the screenwriter might be understood in relation to other types of creative writer, and the role played by the screenwriter might be understood in relation to the role played by the producer or director. Furthermore, because the discipline of creative writing has a highly developed understanding of creative practice research, discussing the ‘sub-discipline’ of screenwriting allows us to draw from its rich literature, which as a result helps to define some of the parameters by which we might understand screen production research.' (Publication abstract)
1 Looking Back in Order to Look Forward : Re-Scripting and Re-Framing Screen Production Research Susan Kerrigan , Craig Batty , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 9 no. 2 2015; (p. 90-92)
'Filmmakers who are also academics want to make creative works as research. This has proven to be a challenging and time-consuming objective for practitioner-academics, despite governmental policy (namely, Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA)) advocating non-traditional research outputs. For example, it is one thing to make a film as research – but it is another to have it recognised as research within an institution, which usually includes the need to provide evidence of peer review or its equivalent. This topic among many has been hotly debated at Australian Screen Production Education and Research Association (ASPERA) annual conferences, and occasionally in some of its publications. But the debates are still ongoing, and given that soon after this special issue is published Australian universities will receive their ERA results, these debates are also likely to continue.' (Publication abstract)
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