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The Lust of Hate single work   novel   fantasy  
Issue Details: First known date: 1897... 1897 The Lust of Hate
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'In this the third of Boothby's Dr. Nikola novels, Nikola applies his almost hypnotic persuasion to convince an out-of-luck Australian, formerly from England, named Gilbert Pennethorne to assist Nikola unwittingly in an evil scheme. Nikola takes advantage of Pennethorne's intense desire for revenge against a former boss in Australia who stole information about the location of a gold field that would have made Pennethorne immensely wealthy.

'Using that information the boss made himself rich, living a high life in London, while Pennethorne remained penniless. Nikola contrives a plan and a device for Pennethorne to commit the perfect murder of the wealthy thief. Unknowingly, Pennethorne thus becomes a party to another one of Nikola's insidious schemes.'

Source: feedbooks.com

Exhibitions

Works about this Work

Guy Boothby and the “Yellow Peril” : Representations of Chinese Immigrants in British Imperial Spaces in the Late-Nineteenth Century Ailise Bulfin , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Victorian Studies , vol. 20 no. 1 2015; (p. 5-23)

'By the end of the nineteenth century the pernicious racial term “yellow peril” had entered the common parlance of Victorians across the British Empire. Ironically, this insidious imperial myth that China would overrun the West owed its genesis to the impact of European, and particularly British imperial activity, on China in the late-nineteenth century, rather than to any expansionary Chinese aims or activity. The western impact was bi-faceted, involving both the physical incursion of westerners into China, and the related movement of Chinese people overseas to work in western nations and colonies. Under the international coerced labour phenomenon known as the “coolie trade,” Chinese people were brought across the British Empire as far as the settler colonies of Australia and South Africa, and even to the plantations of the British West Indies. Despite the relative powerlessness of their position as indentured or indebted immigrants, they were inevitably perceived as hostile aliens who threatened "white" society. This essay examines the impact of Australian anti-Chinese sentiment on representations of Chinese people in the works of Guy Boothby, an Adelaide-born author who emigrated to London in 1893. It explores Boothby’s representations of Chinese people in the imperial spaces of Britain’s Australian and Southeast Asian colonies, and also in the informal imperial spaces of contact in “foreign” China, in the cities and coastal locations where the British Empire was making its presence and influence felt, in works including Boothby’s travelogue, On the Wallaby (1894), the Dr Nikola series of novels (1895-1901), “The Story of Lee Ping” (1895), The Beautiful White Devil (1896) and My Strangest Case (1901). It argues that these superficially disinterested but consistently derogatory representations of the far-flung Chinese contributed to the deplorable international myth of the yellow peril, but also could not help revealing the important and largely overlooked presence of the Chinese in the spaces of the British Empire, demonstrating the impact of the coolie trade on imperial society and signalling the multifaceted nature of the British Empire’s involvement with China.' (Publication summary)

Guy Boothby Graham Stone , 2001 single work review biography
— Appears in: Notes on Australian Science Fiction 2001; (p. 105-107)

— Review of A Bid for Fortune ; Or, Dr Nikola's Vendetta Guy Boothby , 1895 single work novel ; Pharos the Egyptian Guy Boothby , 1898 single work novel ; Farewell, Nikola Guy Boothby , 1901 single work novel ; Dr Nikola's Experiment Guy Boothby , 1899 single work novel ; The Lust of Hate Guy Boothby , 1897 single work novel ; Doctor Nikola Guy Boothby , 1896 single work novel
Literature. Books and Their Makers 1898 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Mail , 4 June vol. 65 no. 1978 1898; (p. 1188)

— Review of The Lust of Hate Guy Boothby , 1897 single work novel
Literature. New Books and New Editions 1898 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Town and Country Journal , 28 May vol. 56 no. 1477 1898; (p. 43)

— Review of The Lust of Hate Guy Boothby , 1897 single work novel
Literature. Books and Their Makers 1898 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Mail , 4 June vol. 65 no. 1978 1898; (p. 1188)

— Review of The Lust of Hate Guy Boothby , 1897 single work novel
Guy Boothby Graham Stone , 2001 single work review biography
— Appears in: Notes on Australian Science Fiction 2001; (p. 105-107)

— Review of A Bid for Fortune ; Or, Dr Nikola's Vendetta Guy Boothby , 1895 single work novel ; Pharos the Egyptian Guy Boothby , 1898 single work novel ; Farewell, Nikola Guy Boothby , 1901 single work novel ; Dr Nikola's Experiment Guy Boothby , 1899 single work novel ; The Lust of Hate Guy Boothby , 1897 single work novel ; Doctor Nikola Guy Boothby , 1896 single work novel
Literature. New Books and New Editions 1898 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Town and Country Journal , 28 May vol. 56 no. 1477 1898; (p. 43)

— Review of The Lust of Hate Guy Boothby , 1897 single work novel
Guy Boothby and the “Yellow Peril” : Representations of Chinese Immigrants in British Imperial Spaces in the Late-Nineteenth Century Ailise Bulfin , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Victorian Studies , vol. 20 no. 1 2015; (p. 5-23)

'By the end of the nineteenth century the pernicious racial term “yellow peril” had entered the common parlance of Victorians across the British Empire. Ironically, this insidious imperial myth that China would overrun the West owed its genesis to the impact of European, and particularly British imperial activity, on China in the late-nineteenth century, rather than to any expansionary Chinese aims or activity. The western impact was bi-faceted, involving both the physical incursion of westerners into China, and the related movement of Chinese people overseas to work in western nations and colonies. Under the international coerced labour phenomenon known as the “coolie trade,” Chinese people were brought across the British Empire as far as the settler colonies of Australia and South Africa, and even to the plantations of the British West Indies. Despite the relative powerlessness of their position as indentured or indebted immigrants, they were inevitably perceived as hostile aliens who threatened "white" society. This essay examines the impact of Australian anti-Chinese sentiment on representations of Chinese people in the works of Guy Boothby, an Adelaide-born author who emigrated to London in 1893. It explores Boothby’s representations of Chinese people in the imperial spaces of Britain’s Australian and Southeast Asian colonies, and also in the informal imperial spaces of contact in “foreign” China, in the cities and coastal locations where the British Empire was making its presence and influence felt, in works including Boothby’s travelogue, On the Wallaby (1894), the Dr Nikola series of novels (1895-1901), “The Story of Lee Ping” (1895), The Beautiful White Devil (1896) and My Strangest Case (1901). It argues that these superficially disinterested but consistently derogatory representations of the far-flung Chinese contributed to the deplorable international myth of the yellow peril, but also could not help revealing the important and largely overlooked presence of the Chinese in the spaces of the British Empire, demonstrating the impact of the coolie trade on imperial society and signalling the multifaceted nature of the British Empire’s involvement with China.' (Publication summary)

Last amended 17 Jan 2017 08:57:21
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