AustLit logo
image of person or book cover 6414661088329430912.jpg
This image has been sourced from Booktopia
y separately published work icon Archipelago selected work   poetry  
  • Author:agent Adam Aitken http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/aitken-adam
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 Archipelago
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'His most personal poetry to date, Adam Aitken's Archipelago is entirely preoccupied with the experience of living and marrying in France. Much of it written while resident at the Keesing Studio in Paris, and then in the south during a seriously cold spring, many of the poems deal with art, Romantic and Modernist writing and writers, and concepts of nostalgia, spirituality, revolution and resistance. One key question is what France (and Europe generally) mean to an Australian writer, which leads the poet to consider the 'French inspired' work of other Australian writers. At a simpler level, the collection attempts to weigh cosmopolitan culture against that of its fictive alternative: semi-rural France, where the poet asks how we might reconcile isolation with social engagement, conservative values with more outward looking perspectives? Adopting the lens of those who live there, Aitken reflects on the region's Gallo-Roman history, its myths, its communal virtues and constraints, its weather, and on the threats to its ecology.' (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Newtown, Marrickville - Camperdown area, Sydney Southern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Vagabond Press , 2017 .
      image of person or book cover 6414661088329430912.jpg
      This image has been sourced from Booktopia
      Extent: 112p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 3 July 2017

      ISBN: 9781922181947

Works about this Work

David Gilbey Reviews Adam Aitken and Elizabeth Allen David Gilbey , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 February no. 89 2019;

— Review of Archipelago Adam Aitken , 2017 selected work poetry ; Present Elizabeth Allen , 2017 selected work poetry

'In a judicious review of two ‘lucid and intelligent books’ on the job of the literary critic* and of a new edition of Eric Auerbach’s Mimesis, Edward Mendelsohn argued against the essential nostalgia of criticism in favour of a version of Kant’s ‘universal subjective’: finding ways to cross ‘the disputed border between popular and elite culture … without pretending it doesn’t exist’. One of the recurring negotiations for the critic – and, I would argue, for the poet – is the difficult business of intimacy: how to inscribe the subjective as both ‘confessional’ (and ‘lyrical’) as well as observational, satirical, evaluative.' (Introduction)

Through the Looking Glass : Two New Poetry Collections David Dick , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 401 2018; (p. 45-46)

'Both Adam Aitken’s Archipelago and Elizabeth Allen’s Present examine the establishment and mutability of identity in the worlds of objects, histories, literature, and media in which they place their speakers. Of course, the exploration of identity is a common theme of poetry, particularly as it pertains to how the material of language helps shape such a tenuous concept. Admittedly, the theme serves primarily as a useful frame through which to enter two starkly different works. All the same, Aitken and Allen’s books prove rewardingly immersive and surprisingly complex in the different ways in which they handle their speakers’ desire for understanding in the crowded spaces of their poetry.'(Introduction)

Of Sarah Rice and Adam Aitken Geoff Page , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 77 no. 3 2017; (p. 193-196)

— Review of Fingertip of the Tongue Sarah Rice , 2017 selected work poetry ; Archipelago Adam Aitken , 2017 selected work poetry
Of Sarah Rice and Adam Aitken Geoff Page , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 77 no. 3 2017; (p. 193-196)

— Review of Fingertip of the Tongue Sarah Rice , 2017 selected work poetry ; Archipelago Adam Aitken , 2017 selected work poetry
David Gilbey Reviews Adam Aitken and Elizabeth Allen David Gilbey , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 February no. 89 2019;

— Review of Archipelago Adam Aitken , 2017 selected work poetry ; Present Elizabeth Allen , 2017 selected work poetry

'In a judicious review of two ‘lucid and intelligent books’ on the job of the literary critic* and of a new edition of Eric Auerbach’s Mimesis, Edward Mendelsohn argued against the essential nostalgia of criticism in favour of a version of Kant’s ‘universal subjective’: finding ways to cross ‘the disputed border between popular and elite culture … without pretending it doesn’t exist’. One of the recurring negotiations for the critic – and, I would argue, for the poet – is the difficult business of intimacy: how to inscribe the subjective as both ‘confessional’ (and ‘lyrical’) as well as observational, satirical, evaluative.' (Introduction)

Through the Looking Glass : Two New Poetry Collections David Dick , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 401 2018; (p. 45-46)

'Both Adam Aitken’s Archipelago and Elizabeth Allen’s Present examine the establishment and mutability of identity in the worlds of objects, histories, literature, and media in which they place their speakers. Of course, the exploration of identity is a common theme of poetry, particularly as it pertains to how the material of language helps shape such a tenuous concept. Admittedly, the theme serves primarily as a useful frame through which to enter two starkly different works. All the same, Aitken and Allen’s books prove rewardingly immersive and surprisingly complex in the different ways in which they handle their speakers’ desire for understanding in the crowded spaces of their poetry.'(Introduction)

Last amended 17 Oct 2018 10:49:20
Subjects:
  • c
    France,
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X