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Issue Details: First known date: 2019... no. 103 September 2019 of The La Trobe Journal est. 1998 The La Trobe Journal
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'In issue No 103 of the La Trobe Journal, Nikita Vanderbyl looks at the work of Aboriginal Australian artist William Barak, while Myles Russell-Cook gives a personal reflection on the artist.

'Catherine Padmore revisits the archive of Joan Lindsay, author of Picnic at Hanging Rock, and Patricia Clarke tells the story of Frances Taylor, founder and editor of the journal Woman's world. Edited by Shona Dewar, the reminiscences of Ursula O’Connor look back at her influential 38-year career as a librarian at the Library.

'Libby Melzer describes the production and likely origin of a remarkable 13th-century pocket Bible, one of the first medieval manuscripts acquired by the Library. Finally, the editor of this issue, Shane Carmody, tells the story of the library of Carlos Barron Lumsden, one volume of which was recently acquired by the Library.' (Journal abstract)

Notes

  • Only literary material within AustLit's scope individually indexed. Other material in this issue includes:

    Libby Melzer : ‘A pocketful of miracles’: The small-format Paris edition manuscript Bible at State Library Victoria

    Shane Carmody : By God’s gift I am what I am’: Relics of the library of Carlos Barron Lumsden

  • Contents indexed selectively.

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2019 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Editorial, Shane Carmody , single work
'On 27 June 1934 a massive marble monument to William Barak (c. 1824–1903) was unveiled in Healesville, 50 kilometres north-east of Melbourne, by the chancellor of the University of Melbourne, Sir John MacFarland, with prayers read by Reverend Donald Cameron, former moderator of the Presbyterian Church. Barak had been the Ngurungaeta, or Elder, of the Wurundjeri-willam clan, and an influential leader for his people. The site, in the main street of Healesville, had been chosen by MacFarland with members of the Australian Natives’ Association, a mutual society with membership restricted to white men born in Australia. The donor of the stone and instigator of the memorial, 96-year-old Anne Fraser Bon, was also present, sheltering at a distance from the persistent rain. Newspaper accounts recorded only one Indigenous witness: ‘an aged Aboriginal, who exhibited a pair of boomerangs held in a pose’.' (Introduction)
(p. 4-5)
William Barak’s Paintings at State Library Victoria, Nikita Vanderbyl , single work essay
'The beat of clap sticks and possum-skin drums fills the air as rows of warriors dance and sing in time to the percussion. Two bright fires glow in the centre of this gathering; nearby the director of ceremonies takes centre stage, wrapped in his possum-skin cloak. This is the scene of celebration presented in a painting by Aboriginal Australian artist William Barak (c. 1824–1903). The artwork in State Library Victoria’s care has been executed in blue pigment, red ochre and black charcoal on a canvas of thick cardboard. Barak applied the paint so thickly that it stands out in three dimensions, like that of an Impressionist work. Another painting, which uses the same thick card as a canvas, also depicts a scene of grouped figures wearing cloaks. Instead of dancing, they stand tall, holding jagged spears and other weapons. A kangaroo and an emu are present; the figures wear lyre bird feathers in their hair: to this observer the painting shows hunting and social arrangements within the community. (Introduction)
(p. 6-23)
William Barak, Myles Russell Cook , single work biography
'Europeans set foot onto Naarm in the first decades of the 19th century. The colony known as Port Phillip District had for millennia been home to the Kulin nation, comprising Wathaurong, Boon Wurrung, Woiwurrung, Taunguerong and Dja Dja Wurrung language groups. They had witnessed the sea level rise, the coast recede; they had seen hills become islands and had witnessed climatic change as the ice age of the Pleistocene epoch ended. Early European settlers failed to recognise the complexity and sophistication of these groups, which lived sustainably on and with their Country. Naarm, which later came to be known as Melbourne, sits on the meeting point of the Birrarung (Yarra River) and its tributaries in the resource-rich lands and waterways of southeast Australia.' (Introduction)
(p. 24-27)
‘Personal Exertion Literary J. Lindsay’ : Joan Lindsay Papers at State Library Victoria, Catherine Padmore , single work essay
'Fifty-two years after Joan Lindsay’s novel Picnic at Hanging Rock (1967) was released, it continues to spark the public imagination, functioning as a locus of creative and scholarly engagement. The book’s central event, the disappearance in 1900 of three schoolgirls and their teacher, creates a ripple pattern that continues to affect those involved.2 Similarly, the story has had a rich and varied afterlife, manifesting in the intervening decades in unexpected and intriguing ways.' (Introduction)
(p. 28-39)
Frances Taylor, Founder and Editor, Guides Woman’s World to Success, Patricia Clarke , single work biography
'When Frances Taylor began a monthly journal, Woman’s World, in December 1921 in Melbourne, which she edited, produced and managed herself, sceptics forecast ‘a speedy death’.1 Two years was regarded as the most a periodical not backed by an established publisher or media interests could expect to survive.2 Against the odds, Woman’s World flourished and within four years had 12,000 readers.3 Several factors contributed to its success, particularly the unique way in which Taylor combined traditional women’s magazine topics of homemaking, mothercraft and fashion with promotion of female independence at a time when a new world of freedom was opening for women. She promoted her vision of independence through articles on women in new fields – for example, building weekenders, travelling to exotic destinations and taking up motoring – and by publicising women in unusual occupations. To this she added her pioneering exploitation of radio broadcasts to publicise her publication and attract readers.' (Introduction)
(p. 40-56)
Ursula O’Connor, Shona Dewar , single work essay
'Mary Ursula O’Connor was born on 21 April 1910, one of five children of civil servant James O’Connor and his wife, Mary Alice (née Walsh). The family lived in Tooronga Road, East Malvern, a suburb of Melbourne.1 Ursula attended Catholic Ladies’ College in East Melbourne, gaining her Leaving Certificate with honours. She and school friend Freda McGlade were appointed as assistants at the Public Library of Victoria on 14 June 1927.2 They were among the Library’s earliest female employees. O’Connor studied part time for a bachelor of arts at the University of Melbourne, graduating in 1933.3 After three years in the Lending Library, she transferred to the Cataloguing Department. During the 1930s she moved to the Reference Library, maintaining the Inquiry Room’s service during the difficulties of the war years. She was appointed head cataloguer at the end of 1946.4 She was a foundation member of the Australian Institute of Librarians and an associate of its successor, the Library Association of Australia, and of the Library Association in the United Kingdom. She served on the council of the Victorian branch of the Library Association of Australia, including a period as secretary.' (Introduction)
(p. 57-68)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Editorial Shane Carmody , 2019 single work
— Appears in: The La Trobe Journal , September no. 103 2019; (p. 4-5)
'On 27 June 1934 a massive marble monument to William Barak (c. 1824–1903) was unveiled in Healesville, 50 kilometres north-east of Melbourne, by the chancellor of the University of Melbourne, Sir John MacFarland, with prayers read by Reverend Donald Cameron, former moderator of the Presbyterian Church. Barak had been the Ngurungaeta, or Elder, of the Wurundjeri-willam clan, and an influential leader for his people. The site, in the main street of Healesville, had been chosen by MacFarland with members of the Australian Natives’ Association, a mutual society with membership restricted to white men born in Australia. The donor of the stone and instigator of the memorial, 96-year-old Anne Fraser Bon, was also present, sheltering at a distance from the persistent rain. Newspaper accounts recorded only one Indigenous witness: ‘an aged Aboriginal, who exhibited a pair of boomerangs held in a pose’.' (Introduction)
Editorial Shane Carmody , 2019 single work
— Appears in: The La Trobe Journal , September no. 103 2019; (p. 4-5)
'On 27 June 1934 a massive marble monument to William Barak (c. 1824–1903) was unveiled in Healesville, 50 kilometres north-east of Melbourne, by the chancellor of the University of Melbourne, Sir John MacFarland, with prayers read by Reverend Donald Cameron, former moderator of the Presbyterian Church. Barak had been the Ngurungaeta, or Elder, of the Wurundjeri-willam clan, and an influential leader for his people. The site, in the main street of Healesville, had been chosen by MacFarland with members of the Australian Natives’ Association, a mutual society with membership restricted to white men born in Australia. The donor of the stone and instigator of the memorial, 96-year-old Anne Fraser Bon, was also present, sheltering at a distance from the persistent rain. Newspaper accounts recorded only one Indigenous witness: ‘an aged Aboriginal, who exhibited a pair of boomerangs held in a pose’.' (Introduction)
Last amended 18 Oct 2019 09:26:54
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