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Cover image courtesy of publisher.
  • Author:agent Philip Mead http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/mead-philip
Issue Details: First known date: 2008... 2008 Networked Language : Culture and History in Australian Poetry
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Networked Language: Culture and History in Australian Poetry is the result of a fascination with poetic language and with the networks of culture and history within which it lives. The language of poetry, which may appear obscure or annoyingly uncommunicative, is nevertheless always meaningful in the time and place of its creation. This study presents new ways of understanding Australian poetry, drawing on an equal fascination with the artifice of poetry and the complexity of culture. It is about the way poetry changes in relation to its social, political and historical contexts, the way poetic communities and the readerships of poetry have changed through history, and continue to change in the present.' (Publisher's blurb)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • North Melbourne, Flemington - North Melbourne area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Australian Scholarly Publishing , 2008 .
      image of person or book cover 4859679172631573697.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: ix, 540p.p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Includes Notes (p.455-536) and Index (p.537-540).
      ISBN: 9781740971973

Works about this Work

Another Dimension : Sweeney Reed's Visual Poetics Brian Reed , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , vol. 32 no. 1/2 2018; (p. 195-208)

'The Heide Museum's 2011 exhibition Born to Concrete offered a rare opportunity to survey the history of visual poetry—a "hybrid genre … in which linguistic structures support pictorial structures and vice versa"—in Australia from the late 1960s onward (Bohn 100). It included a range of mixed and multimedia pieces, including typewritten texts, collages, prints, sculptures, and found objects, and it featured such figures as Ruth Cowen, Aleks Danko, Jas H. Duke, Peter Murphy, ΠO, Alan Riddell, Alex Selenitsch, and Richard Tipping.' (Introduction)

The Avant Garde in ‘Australia’ : After Eddie Paterson, Philip Mead and Caitlin Maling Robert Wood , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , March no. 8 2018;

'A.J. Carruthers has been admirably busy — academic monograph, blog posts for Southerly, a new index of experimental poets on Jacket2, job in Shanghai, daily Tweets. And there is a lot in his project of promoting ‘the Australian avant-garde’ to be sympathetic towards, particularly as a project after his Stave Sightings. But can we make a distinction between his formulation of ‘the Australian avant-garde’ (or its variations such as ‘neo’ and ‘experimental’) and ‘the avant-garde in ‘Australia’’? And how might that matter for suburbanism?'  (Introduction)

Metapolitics vs. Identity Politics : (Re-)Radicalising the Postcolonial Penelope Pitt-Alizadeh , Ali Alizadeh , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 73 no. 1 2013; (p. 57-74)

'Postcolonialism may be defined as a theoretical framework for reading and appreciating cultural production between normative Western "forms of social explanation" and "more complex cultural and political boundaries" that demarcate responses to this normativity (Bhabha 248) As such, this framework has been extremely beneficial for, among other things, introducing and highlighting the work of writers from non-Western cultural backgrounds, particularly Indigenous and multicultural or diasporic writers whose works convey conceptual and aesthetic themes and values at once foreign and responsive to Western European literary modalities. Thanks to postcolonial theory and associated methodologies, a very diverse range of writers from a host of cultural origins and locations has been accepted by and incorporated into most, if not all, Western academic and literary milieus.' (Authors' introduction.)

Damage Control : Australian Literature as Translation Nicholas Jose , 2012 single work prose
— Appears in: Westerly , July vol. 57 no. 1 2012; (p. 102-120)
Rewriting Australian Literature Nicholas Jose , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 95-107)
'There are those of us who are trying to rethink the place of Australian literature in our lives, as readers and writers, students and teachers, and as participants in this society and culture. It's happening from different angles: in the academy, in literary studies, cultural studies, and Australian studies, including Australian history, at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and in research frameworks; in secondary and primary education, locally and nationally; and in the public domain. It's also happening internationally, through translation, and in the many different spaces where Australian literature might have meaning. Meaning, of course, is a first question and the meanings of both 'Australian' and 'literature' are fluid and routinely contested. Coupling the terms only increased the questioning, raising the stakes to beg the question of whether it is meaningful or necessary to talk about Australian literature at all. What is it? Does it exist? Does it matter anymore, or any differently from any other kind of literature, simply because we happen to be in Australia? Does it have a privileged claim on our attention, or, if it does, is that suspect? Each part of the coupling comes with hefty baggage. 'Australian' brings the national, the nation and the nationalistic, identity and belonging, history and culture, citizenship and inclusion/exclusion. 'Literature' brings not only the literary, but also language, and literacy, questions of reading and writing, and teaching and learning in relation to reading and writing. In particular it brings, for my purposes here, those approaches and practices known as 'creative writing' that in recent decades have entered subject English and more broadly the business of how literature is made is made in our society. 'Creative writing' is an infelicitous term, perhaps, but one we're stuck with, understood as something with many manifestations, widespread popularity and its own complex institutional history. Discussion of these things - creative writing and Australian literature in the curricular context - joins with larger debates about our education and contemporary culture that tend, paradoxically, to adopt a rhetoric of embattlement while taking for granted the importance of both related fields. It is surprising that, in a neoliberal, technocratic, metric-managed world, reading, writing and creativity should retain such power and loom so large.' (Author's abstract)
Networked Networks David McCooey , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 305 2008; (p. 16-17)

— Review of Networked Language : Culture and History in Australian Poetry Philip Mead , 2008 single work criticism
Ali Alizadah Reviews Philip Mead Ali Alizadeh , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , no. 29 2008;

— Review of Networked Language : Culture and History in Australian Poetry Philip Mead , 2008 single work criticism
We're One and Many : Remembering Auto/Biographically : The Year's Work in Non-Fiction 2008-2009 Antonio Jose Simoes Da Silva , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , July vol. 54 no. 1 2009; (p. 148-157)

— Review of Father of the House : The Memoirs of Kim E. Beazley Kim E. Beazley , 2009 single work autobiography ; Networked Language : Culture and History in Australian Poetry Philip Mead , 2008 single work criticism ; David Foster : The Satirist of Australia Susan Lever , 2008 multi chapter work criticism ; Je Suis Australienne: Remarkable Women in France, 1880-1945 2008 anthology biography ; Doing Life : A Biography of Elizabeth Jolley Brian Dibble , 2008 single work biography ; Changing Orders : Scenes of Clerical and Academic Life Paul Crittenden , 2008 single work autobiography
Untitled Peter Pierce , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 1 no. 2 2009;

— Review of Networked Language : Culture and History in Australian Poetry Philip Mead , 2008 single work criticism
Nonfiction Christopher Kelen , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Island , Spring no. 118 2009; (p. 81-84)

— Review of Networked Language : Culture and History in Australian Poetry Philip Mead , 2008 single work criticism
Poetry Lives, OK? Jaya Savige , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , June vol. 5 no. 5 2010; (p. 16-17)
Savige responds to recent criticism of contemporary Australian poetry by Ian McFarlane and Christopher Bantick and discusses several recent critical works on Australian poetry.
Biopolitical Correspondences : Settler Nationalism, Thanatopolitics, and the Perils of Hybridity Michael R. Griffiths , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 20-42)
'How does (post)colonial literary culture, so often annexed to nationalist concerns, interface with what Michel Foucalt called biopolitics? Biopolitics can be defined as the regularisation of a population according to the perceived insistence on norms. Indeed, biopolitics is crucially concerned with what is perceptible at the macroscopic level of an entire population - often rendering its operations blind to more singular, small, identitarian, or even communitarian representations and imaginaries. Unlike the diffuse, microscopic, governmental mechanisms of surveillance that identify the need for disciplinary interventions, biopolitics concerns itself with the regularisation of societies on a large scale, notably through demography. As Ann Laura Stoler has put it, Foucault's identification of these two forms of power, 'the disciplining of individual bodies...and the regularization of life processes of aggregate human populations' has led to much productive work in the postcolonialist critique of 'the discursive management of the sexual practices of the colonized', and the resultant 'colonial order of things' (4).' (Author's introduction, 20)
Itinerant Reading, Itinerant Writing : Teaching Australian Literature Contextually Ian Reid , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 16-30)
'Australian literature is like literature in general, only more so: what characterises all reading and writing is embodied with special intensity in this case. Why? Because when you read or write in an Australian context, your imagination is unavoidably and utterly itinerant.' (Author's introduction, 16)
Rewriting Australian Literature Nicholas Jose , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 95-107)
'There are those of us who are trying to rethink the place of Australian literature in our lives, as readers and writers, students and teachers, and as participants in this society and culture. It's happening from different angles: in the academy, in literary studies, cultural studies, and Australian studies, including Australian history, at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and in research frameworks; in secondary and primary education, locally and nationally; and in the public domain. It's also happening internationally, through translation, and in the many different spaces where Australian literature might have meaning. Meaning, of course, is a first question and the meanings of both 'Australian' and 'literature' are fluid and routinely contested. Coupling the terms only increased the questioning, raising the stakes to beg the question of whether it is meaningful or necessary to talk about Australian literature at all. What is it? Does it exist? Does it matter anymore, or any differently from any other kind of literature, simply because we happen to be in Australia? Does it have a privileged claim on our attention, or, if it does, is that suspect? Each part of the coupling comes with hefty baggage. 'Australian' brings the national, the nation and the nationalistic, identity and belonging, history and culture, citizenship and inclusion/exclusion. 'Literature' brings not only the literary, but also language, and literacy, questions of reading and writing, and teaching and learning in relation to reading and writing. In particular it brings, for my purposes here, those approaches and practices known as 'creative writing' that in recent decades have entered subject English and more broadly the business of how literature is made is made in our society. 'Creative writing' is an infelicitous term, perhaps, but one we're stuck with, understood as something with many manifestations, widespread popularity and its own complex institutional history. Discussion of these things - creative writing and Australian literature in the curricular context - joins with larger debates about our education and contemporary culture that tend, paradoxically, to adopt a rhetoric of embattlement while taking for granted the importance of both related fields. It is surprising that, in a neoliberal, technocratic, metric-managed world, reading, writing and creativity should retain such power and loom so large.' (Author's abstract)
Damage Control : Australian Literature as Translation Nicholas Jose , 2012 single work prose
— Appears in: Westerly , July vol. 57 no. 1 2012; (p. 102-120)
Last amended 17 Apr 2014 12:24:50
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